Humans still similar to first animals without heads, arms, or skeletons

555-million-year-old oceanic creatures share genes with today's humans, finds a new study.

Credit: Sohail Wasif/UCR
  • A new study finds genetic links between early oceanic animals and humans.
  • The animals studied had no heads, skeletons, legs, or arms.
  • The creatures were from the Ediacaran era, living about 555 million years ago.
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Incredible fossil shows dinosaur sitting on preserved nest of eggs

Fossils of ancient creatures doing anything are rare. This one is absolutely unique.

Credit: Shundong Bi
  • A new fossil from southern China shows a dinosaur incubating its eggs at the time of its death.
  • The find sheds light on oviraptor eating and egg-tending behavior.
  • The find will be the focus of further study for some time.
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Neanderthals could produce and hear human speech, new study finds

Their ear structures were not that different from ours.

Credit: Mercedes Conde-Valverde/University of Binghamton
  • Neanderthals are emerging as having been much more advanced than previously suspected.
  • Analysis of ear structures indicated by fossilized remains suggests they had everything they needed for understanding the subtleties of speech.
  • The study also concludes that Neanderthals could produce the consonants required for a rich spoken language.
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Record for oldest DNA ever sequenced broken by mammoth remains

One million year old mammoth DNA more than doubles the previous record and suggests that even older genomes could be found.

  • Scientists extracting DNA from mammoth teeth have set a new record for the oldest DNA ever sequenced.
  • The new record holder may also be a member of a new species of mammoth, but that remains to be proven.
  • The findings suggest that DNA as old as 2.6 million years old could be decoded.
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Lair of giant predator worms from 20 million years ago found

Scientists discover burrows of giant predator worms that lived on the seafloor 20 million years ago.

Credit: Rickard Zerpe / Flickr
  • Scientists in Taiwan find the lair of giant predator worms that inhabited the seafloor 20 million years ago.
  • The worm is possibly related to the modern bobbit worm (Eunice aphroditois).
  • The creatures can reach several meters in length and famously ambush their pray.
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