New research suggests MDMA could be used to treat alcoholism

Yet another study shows the potential efficacy of psychedelics in treating addiction.

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Surprising Science
  • MDMA could help alcoholics break their addiction (and not relapse) suggests a new study in the UK.
  • Ketamine became the first FDA-sanctioned psychedelic for use in treating depression earlier this year.
  • The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) organization hopes to have legally prescribed MDMA on the shelves by 2021.
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New evidence shows Neanderthals got 'surfer's ear'

Our relationship with water still matters.

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Surprising Science
  • According to new research, half of Neanderthal skulls studied had exostoses — aka "surfer's ear."
  • The condition is common in mammals that spend a lot of time in water.
  • Though today we are largely disconnected from nature, the consequences of our relationship to it are still felt.
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The surveillance technology that will watch us all, all the time

Wide Angle Motion Imagery (WAMI) is a surveillance game-changer. And it's here.

Photo by Stanislav Krasilnikov\TASS via Getty Images
Technology & Innovation
  • In his new book, Eyes in the Sky, Arthur Holland Michel details the evolution of aerial surveillance technology.
  • Cameras aboard drones can monitor the entirety of 50 square kilometers for hours without refueling.
  • New aerial technologies are going to create the privacy fights of the future.
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3 rules for choosing an arch-nemesis

Eric Weinstein explains why choosing a nemesis is both energizing and necessary for success.

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Personal Growth
  • Eric Weinstein explains the three criteria for choosing an arch-nemesis to help motivate you in your career.
  • Weinstein chose theoretical physicist, Garrett Lisi, who is working on a similar physics problem as him.
  • Rather than hampering progress, Weinstein argues that a nemesis energizes you when you feel discouraged.
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