Eighth century pagan temple to Old Norse gods unearthed in Norway

Rare structures and artifacts of the Viking religion practiced centuries prior to Christianity's introduction have been uncovered by archaeologists in Norway, including a "god house."

A digital reconstruction of an Old Norse "god house."

Photo courtesy of the University Museum of Bergen
  • A 1,200-year-old temple to the Old Norse gods including Thor and Odin has been unearthed in Norway by a team of archaeologists.
  • It was likely used for worship and sacrifices to gods during the midsummer and midwinter solstices, and other fertility festivals.
  • Icelanders are officially practicing the Old Norse pagan religions again; the first temple to the Norse gods in 1000 years is currently being constructed in the City of Reykjavík.
Keep reading Show less

Karma doesn't work how most people think it does

Eastern traditions have complex views on how karma affects your life.

Buddhist statues.

Credit: Pixabay
  • Karma is not simple retribution for bad deeds.
  • Eastern traditions view karma as part of a cycle of birth and rebirth.
  • Actions and intentions can influence karma, which can be both positive and negative.
Keep reading Show less

Is the US actually a democracy?

Law professor Ganesh Sitaraman explains why America has never achieved true democracy—and how it can.

  • Three essential components of democracy are economic equality, social unity, and a government that acts in the interest of the people. America lacks all three of those components, says Vanderbilt University Law School Professor Ganesh Sitaraman.
  • "In study after study, political scientists have shown that our government is responsive primarily to the wealthy and interest groups, not to ordinary people," says Sitaraman. "A system of government that is mostly unresponsive to the people is not a democracy at all."
  • Sitaraman argues that the neoliberal era is what divided America and continues to prevent the country from realizing a true democracy. In this video, he explains the problem with neoliberalism and how a new agenda could create far better opportunities.
Keep reading Show less

Researchers discover intact brain cells of man killed by Mt Vesuvius eruption

The young man died nearly 2,000 years ago in the volcanic eruption that buried Pompeii.

The body's features are outlined with the sketch drawn at the time of the discovery (1961). The posterior part of the skull (the occipital bone and part of the parietals) had completely exploded, leaving the inner part visible. A. Vitrified brain fragment collected from the inner part of the skull; B. Vitrified spinal cord fragment from the spine (SEM, scale bars in mm).

Credit: PLOS ONE
Culture & Religion
  • A team of researchers in Italy discovered the intact brain cells of a young man who died in the Mount Vesuvius eruption in A.D. 79.
  • The brain's cell structure was visible to researchers (who used an electron microscope) in a glassy, black material found inside the man's skull.
  • The material was likely the victim's brain preserved through the process of vitrification in which the intense heat followed by rapid cooling turned the organ to glass.
Keep reading Show less

Study: 75 percent of women executives have experienced imposter syndrome

A new survey also found that women executives believe imposter syndrome to be common among women in corporate America.

Credit: fizkes on Adobe Stock
Culture & Religion
  • A new survey found that three-fourths of women executives have experienced imposter syndrome and believe they put more pressure on themselves to succeed than men.
  • Imposter syndrome was first identified in highly successful women in 1978.
  • Imposter syndrome is a widespread phenomenon, but there are ways to ease the agony.
  • Keep reading Show less

    Nobel Prize in Physics awarded to 3 scientists for black hole discoveries

    Roger Penrose used mathematics to show black holes actually exist. Andrea Ghez and Reinhard Genzel helped uncover what lies at the center of our galaxy.

    The scientists Roger Penrose, Andrea Ghez and Reinhard Genzel.

    Credit: © Nobel Media/Niklas Elmehed.
    Culture & Religion
    • Half of the prize was awarded to Roger Penrose, a British mathematical physicist who proved that black holes ought to exist, if Einstein's relativity is correct.
    • The other half was awarded to Reinhard Genzel, a German astrophysicist, and Andrea Ghez, an American astronomer.
    • Genzel and Ghez helped develop techniques to capture clearer images of the cosmos.
    Keep reading Show less
    Quantcast