Allosaurus dabbled in cannibalism according to new fossil evidence

These Jurassic predators resorted to cannibalism when hit with hard times, according to a deliciously rare discovery.

Stephanie K. Drumheller et.al
  • Rare fossil evidence of dinosaur cannibalism among the Allosaurus has been discovered.
  • Scientists analyzed dinosaur bones found in the Mygatt-Moore Quarry in western Colorado, paying special attention to bite marks that were present on 2,368 of the bones.
  • It's likely that the predatory carnivore only ate their already-dead peers during times when resources were scarce.
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Dinosaur killing meteor hit Earth at 'worst possible angle'

You think you've had a day where everything that went wrong could? T-Rex has you beat.

Credit: Chase Stone
  • A new study suggests that the object that brought about the end of the dinosaurs crashed into the Earth at a 60-degree angle.
  • This is about the worst possible angle for such an impact.
  • The findings also help explain the nature of the impact crater in Yucatan.
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Is poop-filled drinking water what killed ancient giant sloths?

Researchers think they know how a group of ancient sloths, who died thousands of years ago in Ecuador, met their untimely end.

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons
  • Evidence collected from an ancient boneyard in Ecuador suggests that a group of 22 ancient giant sloths died in a wallow of their own feces.
  • Other mammals, such as a deer, a horse, an elephant-like creature called a gomphothere, and another species of ground sloth were identified at the site.
  • The fate of the sloths parallels that of modern hippos who can become lethally poisoned in times of drought when the feces to water ratio shifts in their watering holes.
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Space exploration is the ultimate plan B. Here’s why.

Why did the dinosaurs go extinct? Because they didn't have a space program.

  • Space exploration is more than just the ultimate adventure, our study and investigation of space yields great scientific rewards, says astronaut Garrett Reisman.
  • Earth is wonderful, but it won't last forever, so it's important that we maintain a big picture view to ensure the survival of the human species.
  • Exploring space is our ticket to "the ultimate plan B," according to Reisman. If there were to occur a mass extinction event on Earth, the humans that inhabit another planet in our solar system will be the only hope of human survival.
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New fossils reveal first known swimming dinosaur

Non-avian dinosaurs were thought terrestrially bound, but newly unearthed fossils suggest they conquered prehistoric waters, too.

  • Spinosaurus has remained an elusive quarry for paleontologists despite its initial discovery more than 100 years ago.
  • A recent study of newly excavated fossils suggests the 40-foot-long therapod swam and hunted in waterways.
  • If future evidence confirms the study's findings, it may change our understanding of the Mesozoic era.
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