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The secret to regeneration? Scientists say it lies in the axolotl genome.

Researchers have recently discovered two of the genes that govern this weird-looking salamander's ability to regenerate limbs, eyes, and even its brain.

A mummy murder has been solved after 2,600 years

Researchers confirmed that the mummy known as Takabuti died from a stab wound to the back.

Researchers discover dozens of existing drugs with anti-cancer properties

Numerous drugs designed to treat diabetes, arthritis, and other conditions may actually have secret anti-cancer properties as well.

5 meta-skills to supercharge every aspect of your life

Being a specialist used to be the way forward, but the future belongs to people who can adapt to any given scenario on a dime.

Wuhan coronavirus confirmed to be transmissible between humans

The new strain of coronavirus that has spread across Asia is causing concern ahead of China's Lunar New Year.

Tardigrades' kryptonite? Climate change.

Not so indestructible after all.

Artificial photosynthesis produces 'green methane'

A new device shows promising results in its ability to convert CO2 and water into useful fuels.

The hunt for the 'angel particle' continues

In 2017, researchers believed they had found evidence for the elusive Majorana fermion. Now, a new study found that the exotic class of particles may still be confined to theory.

3 ways quantum computing can help us fight climate change

There's a lot we can do with current technology to help stem the tide of climate change, but future technology may help even more.

Choosing new 'umbrella' species in Australia could save many others

Is the way we choose which animals to protect out of date?

North Atlantic Current could stop within the next century

New research suggests the ocean current that delivers warm water to Europe has a one-in-six chance of halting temporarily over the next hundred years, potentially resulting in freezing temperatures.

Nuclear-powered Mars rover to search for old life, prepare for human life

The Mars 2020 rover is set to launch in July of the same year, setting the stage for years and years of science on the Red Planet.

New membrane enables us to harvest 'osmotic' energy from water

You've likely heard of solar energy, but what is osmotic energy?

Rolls-Royce to launch all-electric plane in 2020

The racing plane is hoped to be the fastest electric plane in existence.

Global emissions slowed down in 2019, but still reached a record high

Recent research estimates that the growth of emissions slowed down to 0.6 percent in 2019. However, this still means that humans released more CO2 into the atmosphere in 2019 than in any other year.

Humans are exposed to 44 times as much BPA as previously assumed

A new method of measuring human exposure to the potentially toxic chemical calls into question regulatory policy.

Boeing to halt production of the 737 as FAA continues review

Following two deadly crashes, the FAA has been engaged in a lengthy review process of the Boeing 737. With recent news that the review may continue into 2020, Boeing has opted to halt production of the plane.

Greta Thunberg, climate change activist, wins Time Person of the Year

Going from a solitary teenage protester in front of the Swedish parliament to a global icon in little more than a year certainly merits a distinction.

10 mind-bending books on the nature of time

Why does time flow in one direction? Why do humans perceive time so differently than it really is? Is there really a difference between the present, the past, and the future? These books explore these questions and more.

Why there are reasons to be optimistic about coral reefs

Let's not kid ourselves: Coral reefs are in serious danger. But numerous ambitious projects are underway with the goal of keeping these ecosystems alive.

One of the best ways to treat anxiety? A full night's rest, new research suggests.

Researchers discover that not only can anxiety prevent you from sleeping, but not getting a good night's sleep might also cause anxiety.

The ketogenic diet may help fight against the flu

Researchers found that the popular diet could confer some benefits to your immune system.

How bland positive messages help Russian trolls spread disinformation

The Internet Research Agency has learned that you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.

Distant cosmic body renamed over Nazi backlash

The object, originally dubbed "Ultima Thule," was renamed to "Arrokoth" due to the connection between the word "Thule" and the Nazis.

'One among millions': DNA is not the only genetic molecule

A recent computer analysis found that millions of possible chemical compounds could be used to store genetic information. This begs the question — why DNA?

Billions of fake accounts: Who's messaging you on Facebook?

The social media company's recent transparency report claimed that it had taken down a staggering number of fake accounts — but it's unlikely they're catching them all.

Scientists create precursor to life in thermal vent experiment

Scientists speculate that if life were to have spontaneously developed on Earth, the first thing there would need to be are vesicles.

The perks of being a bit neurotic

It's one of our five major personality traits, and arguably, it's the worst one. Why are some human beings neurotic?

Top 4 candidates in our solar system for terraforming

When it comes time for humanity to pick a new home, where will we go?

One shot for life: New research brings us closer to universal flu vaccine

Researchers recently discovered an antibody that totally disrupts the influenza virus's ability to replicate; it could be used to design a universal flu vaccine.

'Waves' of fluid clear the brain of toxins during sleep, say researchers

The finding represents one of the first times we have observed how the human brain clears out its waste products.

Focus on renewable energy, not carbon capture, say researchers

Rather than scrubbing the emissions from fossil fuel plants, a new analysis suggests we should simply replace those power plants with renewable alternatives.

Scientists find a marker for schizophrenia in human hair

Not only will this help diagnose schizophrenia earlier, but it also points to a possible cause of schizophrenia.

Why we need to praise kids' teachability — not just their ability

In the fight between talent and hard work, hard work usually wins.

Why more play is the key to creativity and productivity

Adult recess and other apparently ridiculous activities may be one of the best ways to feel, work, and be better.

Top 6 ways to suck greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere

Researchers evaluated the best and worst ways to remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere in a recent report.

Is Rwanda in line to become one of Africa's major tech hubs?

Recent years have seen countries across the African continent investing deep into the tech industry. Rwanda is angling to get ahead of the pack.

Mutation in 'junk DNA' behind several deadly cancers

A single typo in the "dark matter" of the genome drives multiple types of cancer.

Forgotten Nazi pesticide rediscovered — it was safer than DDT

For decades, Americans sprayed the notorious pesticide DDT all over their homes and fields. But it turns out we may have known about — and ignored — a safer alternative used by the Nazi regime.

The most undervalued skill? Lateral thinking.

Our society mostly emphasizes developing logical, procedural thinking skills, but this isn't the only way to come up with great ideas. Forgetting to develop our lateral thinking skills may mean missing out on unexpected innovations.

5 of history's strangest scientific theories

Rest assured: Kooky ideas like the Earth being flat or vaccines causing autism are nothing new. Humanity has had worse ideas before.

Bored to death: What is boreout syndrome?

The under-recognized condition affects workers in offices across the globe.

Imprisonment: Doctor who illegally prescribed 500,000 doses of opioids to serve 40 years

Dr. Joel Smithers was recently sentenced to decades in prison for the numerous illegal prescriptions he gave out.

The Nazis' love affair with the occult

Why were the Nazis so enamored with the occult, pseudoscience, and magic?

Near-impossibly massive neutron star detected

Astronomers have recently discovered the most massive neutron star to date, nearly at the theoretical limit for such stars. But it's only about the size of a small city.

Could Earth have a 'shadow' biosphere?

Some scientists think there may be a hidden, second form of life living right under our noses.

Investing $1.8 trillion in climate adaptation could yield $7.1 trillion

A new report argues that we stand to gain a lot economically by investing in 5 key areas.

Dictators and mass murders: Understanding 'malignant narcissism'

Most of us can't imagine wanting absolute control over a nation or feeling compelled to commit mass murders — so then what is it about a dictator's psychology that makes them different?

Millennials and the rise of tiny homes

Are tiny homes just a trend for wealthy minimalists or an economic necessity for the growing poor?

The other self-actualization: What's the difference between Maslow and Rogers?

Most of us have heard of Abraham Maslow and his hierarchy of needs, but Maslow doesn't have a monopoly on self-actualization.

How do 80-year-old 'super-agers' have the brains of 20-somethings?

Most elderly individuals' brains degrade over time, but some match — or even outperform — younger individuals on cognitive tests.

High-fat diets change your brain, not just your body

Unhealthy diets cause the part of your brain responsible for appetite to become inflamed, encouraging further eating and obesity.

What does self-actualization mean in different cultures?

Critics complain that Maslow's hierarchy of needs focuses too much on the West. Yet other cultures often have similar ideas about personal development.

Is veganism bad for brain health?

Although they may be healthier in many ways, more ethical, and better for the environment, restrictive diets don't come without their challenges.

Many vegetative patients are actually 'covertly conscious'

This unsettling new understanding of vegetative patients raises medical ethics issues.

The next clean energy source? Snow.

Researchers from UCLA invent a device that generates electricity from a rather unusual source.

Can you use narrative to shape your life?

Storytelling has been a human tradition for thousands of years and for good reason: It holds a powerful influence over our psychology.

There are 12 million stateless people in the world. Who are they?

Without a country to belong to, many of these people lack some of the most fundamental rights.

Why this activist is calling for the mass ingestion of psychedelics

Gail Bradbrook, co-founder of Extinction Rebellion, called for a mass psychedelic act of civil disobedience in protest of drug criminalization.

8 ways to achieve self-actualization

The term "self-actualization" is often bandied about on the web, but how does one go about becoming self-actualized really?

What was it like to live in a Japanese concentration camp?

During World War II, the U.S. incarcerated over 100,000 Japanese Americans in concentration camps throughout the West.

How can felons be rehabilitated when prison labor is good for big business?

Until the use of prison labor is banned, many stakeholders will be incentivized to prevent felons from being rehabilitated.

How meditation can make you a better learner

Meditation doesn't just reduce stress or make you a more spiritual person; it changes your brain in a variety of ways that can make it easier to learn new information.

Should cognitive behavioral therapy be taught in school?

This modern therapy technique has been shown to be effective and easy to learn — could teaching it to students help cut off a growing mental health crisis?

Is self-actualization a biological need?

We think of self-actualization as a lofty goal, but research suggests it may just be another way of obeying our biological programming.

Malevolent creativity: When evil gets innovative

We like to think of creativity as an inherently good thing. History and science say otherwise.

What we know about the dangers of e-cigarettes

Compared to traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes are extremely understudied. There is, however, some evidence on their negative effects on your health.

Maslow's forgotten pinnacle: Self-transcendence

Abraham Maslow's famous hierarchy of needs is depicted as a triangle with self-actualization at the very top. Right before his death, Maslow wanted to add another to the hierarchy: Self-transcendence.

The U.K.'s solution for affordable housing? Shipping containers.

"Cargotecture" is becoming increasingly popular as a cheap alternative to traditional houses.

5 ways of valuing a human being

Ever wondered how much you're worth?

TESS satellite identifies nearby, potentially habitable super-Earth

We may find signs of life a mere 31 light-years away.

Why, in India, female farmers are paying to become 'womb-less'

In one Indian farming district, many women are paying for expensive and medically unnecessary hysterectomies in order to be more productive at work.

We've heard of self-actualization, but what is secondary integration?

Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs is a well-known model of human development, but Maslow's friend and colleague Kazimierz Dąbrowski believed humans developed in a different way.

When your gut makes its own alcohol it's called 'auto-brewery syndrome'

It might sound like fun, but this rare condition can make life very difficult.

In this remote Indian village, every person's name is a song

In the village of Kongthong, villagers don't call each other by their name; instead, they call out using unique, bespoke tunes that resemble birdsong.

9 self-actualized historical figures

When he was developing his famous hierarchy of needs, Abraham Maslow cited 9 historical figures that achieved self-actualization.

Is autism caused by environmental or genetic factors?

When it comes to lifelong conditions like autism spectrum disorder, we tend to be biased in a way that obscures reality.

Scientists develop an 'EpiPen' for brain and spinal cord injuries

This new research could help individuals recover from one of the most dreaded types of injury.

Did the U.S. weaponize ticks?

Considering the U.S.'s history of biological warfare, maybe this theory isn't as crazy as it sounds.

Schizophrenia here is different than schizophrenia there — why?

Most diseases don't differ depending on where you're from. Schizophrenia, however, is heavily dependent on your culture.

Should people really pursue self-actualization?

It's a popular buzzword among the self-help community, but does trying to become self-actualized do any good?

A new spray may help treat the deadly white-nose syndrome

Bats are being subjected to a deadly plague that may be threatening their existence. However, a new bacterial spray may help fight the fungus responsible.

It's never really now: 4 ways your brain plays with time

We don't perceive time in an objective fashion; instead, the brain interprets time in a complex and amorphous way.

Bank loans at 'unimaginable' interest rates: How the Spanish press became corrupted

A new book from the former editor of El Mundo describes a culture of corruption in Spain's press. In exchange for favorable coverage of politicians and corporations, bribes.

How oceanic evolution took a left turn 170 million years ago

New research reveals a major shift in what pressures life used to face.

Where does intelligence reside in the brain?

There are a few different theories out there, but the parieto-frontal integration theory, or P-FIT, appears to give us the best model of the neuroscience of intelligence.

The Big Bounce: Why our universe might be eternal

When it comes to theories of the universe, the Big Bang theory is almost accepted as a fact. However, it's still uncertain, and some scientists believe that the universe didn't began with a bang, but a bounce.

Cockroaches are evolving to become invincible

They're hiding in your house, carrying germs, and now there's virtually no way to kill them.

Why are intelligent people more likely to abuse drugs?

The downsides of drug abuse are so clear that one would imagine smarter folks would stay away from them. The research suggests otherwise.

Berlin freezes rent for five years

The once-famously cheap city is growing more expensive by the year, pricing out the artists that it was once known for.

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