A guide to making better decisions

In Well Grounded, behavioral neuroscience professor Kelly Lambert says it's all about contingency planning.

  • Willingness to roll with the punches is an essential component of good mental health.
  • An inability to foresee a range of consequences adversely affects emotional responses.
  • A good contingency plan makes all the differences, argues neuroscience professor Kelly Lambert.
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Psychological gym experiment proves the power of mind over matter

It isn't mind over matter as much as mind properly working with matter.

  • A new Stanford study finds believing you have genetic predispositions for obesity and low exercise endurance changes your physiology.
  • Participants told they had a protective obesity gene had a better response than those told they did not, even if they did not actually have the gene.
  • Runners performed poorly after learning they did not have the gene for endurance, even if they actually have the gene.
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Helen Riess, M.D. – Empathy in the brain and the world

Empathy makes us human. Humans make structures that rob us of empathy when we need it most. Helen Riess is trying to reverse that trend.

  • Heart – mind = emotional quicksand. Mind – heart = greeting card sympathy
  • The doctor burnout epidemic and how to fix it
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Why victims of childhood adversity have a harder time achieving their goals

Childhood trauma can affect a child's brain in dramatic ways for the rest of their lives.

Mind & Brain
  • New findings suggest that childhood adversity may be directly linked to depression.
  • Adverse childhood experiences include a wide range of stressful or traumatic events brought upon by abuse and neglect.
  • Important landmark studies from the '90s suggest that these experiences are common and lead to a number of health, social and behavioral problems throughout life.
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Why practicing empathy matters, and how VR can help

VR's coolest feature? Boosting compassion and empathy.

Videos
  • Virtual reality fills us with awe and adrenaline — and the technology is only at a crude stage, explains VR filmmaker Danfung Dennis. It's capable of inspiring something much greater in us: empathy.
  • With coming technological advancements in pixel display, haptics, and sound tracking, VR users will finally be able to know what it's like to really take another person's perspective. Empathy is inherent in humans (and other animal species), but just as it can be squashed, it must be practiced in order to develop.
  • "This ability to improve ourselves to become a more empathetic and compassionate society is what I hope we will use this technology for," Dennis says.
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Mind control using sound waves? We ask a scientist how it works.

Oxford University's Antoine Jerusalem explains the art of ultrasound neuromodulation.

Mind & Brain

At the moment, non-invasive neuromodulation – changing brain activity without the use of surgery – looks poised to usher in a new era of healthcare. Breakthroughs could include the better management of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, reducing the pain of migraines or even reversing cognitive disorders caused by brain injury.

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