Wait for it: how schizophrenia illuminates the nature of pleasure

Pleasure is not just about experiencing an enjoyable moment. It also involves anticipation – a connection between one's present and future selves.

Schizophrenia is one of the most widely misunderstood of human maladies. The truth of the illness is far different from popular caricatures of a sufferer muttering incoherently or lashing out violently. People with schizophrenia are, in fact, not more likely to be violent than people without schizophrenia. About one per cent of the worldwide population has schizophrenia, affecting men and women, rich and poor, and people of all races and cultures. It can be treated with medication and psychosocial treatments, though the treatments don't work well for every person and for every symptom. Most of all, it impacts everything that makes us human: the way one thinks, the way one behaves, and the way one feels – particularly the ability to experience pleasure.

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What happens when you learn how much your coworkers make?

New research shows that the answer is more subtle than you might think.

  • The debate on whether to be transparent about our salaries has been going on for decades.
  • New research shows that depending on whether we share our salaries vertically (from boss to employee) or horizontally (between equal peers), we can expect different effects in our productivity and motivation.
  • Millennials are more likely to share salary information than previous generations. What effect will this have on the workplace?
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This 5-minute neck scan can spot dementia 10 years before it emerges

The results come from a 15-year study that used ultrasound scans to track blood vessels in middle-aged adults starting in 2002.

  • The study measured the stiffness of blood vessels in middle-aged patients over time.
  • Stiff blood vessels can lead to the destruction of delicate blood vessels in the brain, which can contribute to cognitive decline.
  • The scans could someday become a widely used tool to identify people at high risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer's.
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Stand up straight! Scientists have found 'posture' cells

Scientists have discovered that neurological response to posture is separate from movement.

Photo: Andrew Nourse / flickr
Personal Growth
  • Increasingly bad posture is being seen due to phone usage and other bad habits.
  • Researchers have discovered "posture cells" that can be isolated from movement.
  • This could have a profound effect on our understanding of body schema.
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Men obsessed with building muscle mass have higher mental health risks

They're at a higher risk for depression, weekend binge drinking, and unnecessary dieting.

Palestinian participants flex their muscles during a bodybuilding competition in Gaza city on October 28, 2016. / AFP / MOHAMMED ABED (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
Mind & Brain
  • Body dysmorphia is not limited to women, a new study from Norway and Cambridge shows.
  • Young men that focus on building muscle are at risk for a host of mental and physical health problems.
  • Selfie culture is not helping the growing number of teens that are anxious and depressed.
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“My-side bias” makes it difficult for us to see the logic in arguments we disagree with

"Our results show why debates about controversial issues often seem so futile," the researchers said.

A supporter of Democratic healthcare reforms (L), argues with a reform opponent before a Town Hall meeting held by Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) on August 11, 2009 in Alhambra, California. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
Mind & Brain

In what feels like an increasingly polarised world, trying to convince the "other side" to see things differently often feels futile. Psychology has done a great job outlining some of the reasons why, including showing that, regardless of political leanings, most people are highly motivated to protect their existing views.

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