Mystery of the gigantic Oort cloud from deep space explained

Astronomers possibly solve the mystery of how the enormous Oort cloud, with over 100 billion comet-like objects, was formed.

Credit: Pablo Carlos Budassi via Wikimedia, licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0
  • The Oort cloud is a gigantic "cloud" at the edge of the solar system, about 3,000 times the distance between the Earth and the Sun.
  • Astronomers used computer simulations to reconstruct the first 100 million years of the Oort cloud's existence.
  • The Oort cloud may consist of the "leftovers" from the solar system's formation
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The Mars helicopter's scary sixth mission

The helicopter's sixth mission almost went down in disaster.

Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech
  • The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was out on a photo-taking mission when it started to act strangely.
  • It kept changing its speed and tipping back and forth.
  • A single error threw its entire navigation system into confusion.
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Is the universe infinite?

Determining if the universe is infinite pushes the limits of our knowledge.

Credit: NASA / Quality Stock Arts / Adobe Stock
  • The size and shape of the universe has yet to be resolved.
  • The size of the universe is linked to understanding its shape and the limits of our observations.
  • New studies and going deeper into space will help us answer the question: "Is the universe infinite?"
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Scientists find dark matter “bridges” that may reveal future of our galaxy

A new AI-generated map of dark matter shows previously undiscovered filamentary structures connecting galaxies.

CREDIT: Hong et. al., Astrophysical Journal.
  • Scientists use artificial intelligence to produce a new map of dark matter in the local universe.
  • The map's precision may lead to new insights into dark matter and the future of our universe.
  • The map contains previously unknown "hidden bridges" that link galaxies.
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How space debris created the world’s largest garbage dump

Since 1957, the world's space agencies have been polluting the space above us with countless pieces of junk, threatening our technological infrastructure and ability to venture deeper into space.

Credit Framestock via Adobe Stock
  • Space debris is any human-made object that's currently orbiting Earth.
  • When space debris collides with other space debris, it can create thousands more pieces of junk, a dangerous phenomenon known as the Kessler syndrome.
  • Radical solutions are being proposed to fix the problem, some of which just might work. (See the video embedded toward the end of the article.)
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