​Researchers breed a fungus that kills mites to save bees

Researchers develop a fungus that kills mites that contribute to honey bee Colony Collapse Disorder.

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  • Honeybee colony collapse is due in part to Varroa mites that weaken honey bee immune systems.
  • Chemicals that were once effective against the mites are no longer working as well.
  • Researchers are stepping in with a newly cultured fungus that goes after the mites without bothering the bees.
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Vertical farming: disrupting agriculture

A new agricultural revolution could forever change the planet.

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  • Vertical farming leverages cutting-edge technology to grow food in a new and better way.
  • One of its many benefits is that it can increase crop yield by 700 percent.
  • Vertical farming can help relieve pressure on scarce resources and boost Earth's biodiversity.
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‘Mad honey’: The rare hallucinogen from the mountains of Nepal

Of the world's 300 honey varieties, none is stranger and more dangerous than mad honey.

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  • Mad honey is produced by bees who feed on specific species of rhododendron plants, which grow in mountainous regions like those surrounding the Black Sea.
  • People have used mad honey for centuries for recreational, medicinal, and military purposes. Low doses cause euphoria and lightheadedness, while high doses cause hallucinations and, in rare cases, death.
  • Mad honey is still harvested and sold today, though it's illegal in some nations.
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How your daily coffee can help tropical forests grow back

Researchers find that the coffee pulp is valuable in its own right.

Credit: Rebecca Cole/British Ecological Society
  • When coffee is harvested, the skin and pulp surrounding the bean are often discarded.
  • Costa Rica, which had much of its tropical forests chopped down for agricultural use, is testing coffee pulp as a way to help reforest the country.
  • A new study finds that coffee pulp can help reforest land in just two years.
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    Butterfly population collapse linked to climate change

    If we lose our pollinators, we'll soon lose everything else.

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    • New research has found that warmer autumns are driving the extinction of monarch butterflies.
    • Globally, 40 percent of insect populations are in decline; one-third are in danger of extinction.
    • Insects pollinate three-fourths of the world's crop supply, resulting in 1.4 billion jobs.
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