Neurotechnology today: What’s real, what’s coming

A balanced discussion of the realities, the mythologies, and the concerns surrounding cutting-edge brain research.

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Mind & Brain
  • A new film, I AM HUMAN, takes a comprehensive look at the realities of neurotechnology today.
  • The film follows three patients for whom experimental treatment may be the best option.
  • Experts weigh in on the difficulties and the promise of neurotech.
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Image source: 80's Child / ArtFamily / Shutterstock / Big Think
Surprising Science
  • A panel of eight experts in the evolution of the human face have collaborated on a new summary of how we've changed.
  • Their paper promotes the importance of social interaction as a factor in the structure of our visages.
  • We can visually express more than 20 categories of emotion. Early humans not so much.
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Rats 'feel the distress' of other rats, Dutch neuroscientists say

They seem to have a mechanism for caring similar to ours.

Image source: Ukki Studio/Shutterstock
Surprising Science
  • A new study demonstrates that a rat will respond to another's pain.
  • Freezing in place as another rat is shocked is one of empathy's visible indicators.
  • The rats' mechanism for feeling the distress of others seems to be similar to our own.
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Eyes front! Your headband says you’re daydreaming.

China is testing electronic monitoring of students' attention levels.

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Technology & Innovation
  • Schools are experimenting with students wearing EEG headbands as a means to monitor the amount of attention they're paying.
  • The headbands are a product of a U.S company, BrainCo.
  • The hope is that such monitoring will help students learn and teachers teach more effectively.


It would be great if school were always fascinating and compelling, especially to young minds dutifully at their desks day after day, month after month. Alas, it's not so. What would childhood schools days have been without windows through which we could gaze at the sky, at cars, dog-walkers, and really anything at all other than the teacher and the blackboard, or today's equivalent, smartboards? Educators in China, it's being reported by SupChina, are having none of that. They've experimenting with headbands that allow them to monitor how well each of their students is paying attention.

Testing, testing...

The headbands the Chinese are trying out actually come from America, from Boston startup BrainCo. The trackers are a product called the FocusEDU, and were developed in association with Harvard Center of Brain Science Neuroimaging. It's based on an algorithm from NASA .

The Chinese are checking out the headbands in Hangzhou in Zhejiang Province. Another school in Jinhua in the same province has previously given them a shot. BrainCo says that in January, it completed a 21-day trial involving 10,000 Chinese students. (The company is also working with schools in Mexico, Spain, and Brazil.) A distribution deal in China has already been arranged for 20,000 headsets. BrainCo founder Bincheng Han tells the Daily Mail, "Our goal with the first 20,000 devices, each of which will be used by multiple students in schools, is to capture data from 1.2 million people."

The company says the January trials resulted in better grades, though there's no independent confirmation of that, and no scholarly studies have yet been done to confirm the claim. The neuroscience community would no doubt require such evidence to be totally onboard with the idea of the headbands.

The company envisions sharing their database of brain activity with research entities down the road. The more customers they get for their product, the larger the database, of course.

How the headbands can help

In a headbanded classroom, a teacher can easily track an individual student's attention level via an attention-level report that shows what's going on in their brain. This can identify students who need extra help remaining engaged. BrainCo envisions these reports also being used by the students themselves as a way of assessing their own attentiveness during lessons.

The system also provides metrics on the entire class' aggregated attention level to the instructor, who can then fine-tune the curriculum to more effectively resonate with learners.

Finally, school administrators can use "big-data analysis" to learn more about how and when their student populations learn best, and modify schedules accordingly. They can also derive teaching best practices from the data to strengthen the connection teachers make with their students.

What the headbands detect

As with the adult version of Focus depicted here, FocusEDU headbands use electroencephalography (EEG) technology to monitor each wearer's' brain.

In terms of downside, some students reportedly find the headband uncomfortably restrictive, and the devices' presence adds an additional layer of competitiveness and pressure to the classroom experience — teachers in the tests announce the top three most attentive students at the end of each class. The kids are too young to be concerned about personal privacy, but it seems likely their parents and privacy advocates would have some interesting thoughts.