Study links 'sun-seeking behavior' to genes involved in addiction

A large-scale study from King's College London explores the link between genetics and sun-seeking behaviors.

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  • There are a number of physical and mental health benefits to sun exposure, such as boosted vitamin D and serotonin levels and stronger bones.
  • Addictions are multi-step conditions that, by definition, require exposure to the addictive agent and have also been proven to have a genetic factor. Countless people are exposed to addictive things, but not all become addicted. This is because of the genetic component of addiction.
  • This large-scale study explores the link between sun-seeking behaviors and the genetic markers for addiction.
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4 breathing techniques to get you through high-stress moments

You're always in control of your breath.

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  • Anxiety is triggered environmentally and emotionally, but a physiological response quickly follows.
  • Calming breathing techniques help to tamp down the physiological response of anxiety.
  • The following four exercises are known to help calm anxiety and develop focus.
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What really happens in your body and brain when you orgasm?

You may be surprised at how your body and brain react to this type of pleasure.

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  • An orgasm is described as a feeling of intense pleasure that happens during sexual activity.
  • By studying the brain activity of people experiencing orgasms, researchers have been able to pinpoint some of the key changes that occur.
  • These changes include heightened sensitivity to areas of the brain that control how we feel pain, making us less sensitive to it.
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Creativity: The science behind the madness

Human brains evolved for creativity. We just have to learn how to access it.

  • An all-star cast of Big Thinkers—actors Rainn Wilson and Ethan Hawke; composer Anthony Brandt; neuroscientists David Eagleman, Wendy Suzuki, and Beau Lotto; and psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman—share how they define creativity and explain how our brains uniquely evolved for the phenomenon.
  • According to Eagleman, during evolution there was an increase in space between our brain's input and output that allows information more time to percolate. We also grew a larger prefrontal cortex which "allows us to simulate what ifs, to separate ourselves from our location in space and time and think about possibilities."
  • Scott Barry Kaufman details 3 brain networks involved in creative thinking, and Wendy Suzuki busts the famous left-brain, right-brain myth.

A breakthrough in chronic pain relief

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen might have discovered a cure.

  • A team at the University of Copenhagen discovered a peptide that cured mice of chronic pain with no side effects.
  • An estimated 7-10 percent of the world's population suffers from chronic pain.
  • The peptide, Tat-P4-(C5)2, previously showed signs of curing addiction in mice.
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