The growth of an organism rides on a pattern of waves

Study shows ripples across a newly fertilized egg are similar to ocean and atmospheric circulations.

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When an egg cell of almost any sexually reproducing species is fertilized, it sets off a series of waves that ripple across the egg's surface.

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Increasing numbers of people are in pain. How do we cope?

A new study reminds us that physical and emotional pain are not far apart.

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  • Physical and emotional pain are not that distinct, given that both are routed through a single brain region.
  • A new study at NYU shows that physical pain can lessen the effects of depression and emotional duress.
  • Holistic methods for dealing with both physical and emotional pain should be considered.
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5 neuroscience reality checks, from a top neuroscientist

In his new book, The Deep History of Ourselves, Joseph LeDoux explains where we come from.

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  • In his latest book, neuroscientist Joseph LeDoux challenges current assumptions about emotions and consciousness.
  • LeDoux investigates the origins of life on this planet dating back four billion years.
  • His book is a reminder that humans share the planet with a diverse array of animals and that, while unique, consciousness is not the only trait worth celebrating.
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Does ‘night mode’ shift your brain out of sleep mode?

A new study suggests that a device's night mode may damage sleep hygiene even more.

  • The social consensus claims that blue-light emitting devices interrupt sleep by curbing melatonin production.
  • However, new research suggests that the ruddy hues of "night mode" may have a more detrimental effect on quality sleep.
  • While causal effect remains unknown, the correlation between screen time and poor sleep habits is nonetheless strong.
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What is free will, really? Steven Pinker explains.

The processes behind our ability to make decisions are complex, but they're not miracles.

  • Free will exists, but by no means is it a miracle.
  • We use "free will" to describe the more complex processes by which behavior is selected in the brain. These neurological steps taken to make decisions respect all laws of physics.
  • "Free will wouldn't be worth having or extolling, in moral discussions, if it didn't respond to expectations of reward, punishment, praise, blame," Pinker says.
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