Climate change is here. It's time to begin "managed retreats" according to scholars.

Humans hate to surrender, but this clearly makes good sense.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images
  • In a new Science article, three academics make the case for managed retreat due to climate change.
  • Beginning the process now instead of waiting until it's too late will save money and lives.
  • Indonesia is moving its capital from Jakarta to Borneo as the former city is sinking.
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The dirty side of renewable energy

Our clean energy needs to be sourced responsibly right from the get-go.

  • Clean technologies rely on a wide range of metals sourced from unsustainable mining.
  • Mineral extraction damages local communities and environments, destroying cultures and biodiversity in the process.
  • Human rights and conservationist efforts are put at risk due to mining.
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Icelandic plaque to commemorate first glacier 'killed' by climate change

A grim warning for the future of Iceland's glaciers.

PEXELS - Jay Mantri
  • Icelandic locals and scientists have created a plaque for the melted Okjökull glacier.
  • Due to climate change, the glacier is no more.
  • If this trend persists, by 2200 all of Iceland's glaciers will have melted.
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Use these phrases when talking about climate change

Phrases like "Global warming" and "climate change" don't carry any weight.

Pexels
  • A neurological study shows that there are better ways to get someone to care about the threat of a climate in crisis.
  • Catastrophe and more visceral words are more likely to make someone take action.
  • Framing the problem in a different way can make naysayers come over to the cause.
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The Pine Island Glacier is about to calve another monster iceberg

This is doubly worrisome on the heels of the recent UN climate change report, which gave humanity an urgent deadline to cut carbon emissions: just 12 years.

Credit: Landsat OLI imagery. Processed by Stef Lhermitte/Delft University of Technology.
  • It's the same glacier that calved in September 2017, losing an iceberg 4.5 times the size of Manhattan.
  • The size of this one, however, is about 15% bigger than the last. It's the sixth large-calving event from this glacier since 2001.
  • The irreversible collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet would raise sea levels 20 feet, says the UN.
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