Your romantic partner is probably less intelligent than you think, suggests new study

Our egotism and self-confidence can sometimes spill-over to our loved ones.

It's now well known that many of us over-estimate our own brainpower. In one study, more than 90 per cent of US college professors famously claimed to be better than average at teaching, for instance – which would be highly unlikely. Our egos blind us to our own flaws.

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Given how many of us listen to music while studying or doing other cerebral work, you'd think psychology would have a set of clear answers as to whether the practice is likely to help or hinder performance. In fact, the research literature is rather a mess (not that that has deterred some enterprising individuals from making bold claims).

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Growing up in nature reduces mental issues by up to 55%

As we urbanize, a new study flags the need for lots of green spaces.

(haireena/Shutterstock)
  • A childhood spent in green spaces reduces the chance of acquiring adult mental disorders by 15% to 55%.
  • A comprehensive study tracked the life stories of one million Danes to reach this conclusion.
  • Humanity is moving to cities, and the report underscores the need for ample green spaces for children.
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It takes very little to successfully disguise yourself

A new study finds even simple, easy, appearance alterations fool people

(Getty Images/Big Think)
  • We're not as good at facial recognition as you might think.
  • Who needs Mission Impossible latex masks?
  • You can change your hair or make up and pass for someone else.
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New study finds strength of imagination not associated with creative ability or achievement

If you have a strong imagination, this won't help you with academic study.

Imagination is sometimes claimed to be a uniquely human ability, and it has long intrigued psychologists. "Nevertheless, our understanding of the benefits and risks that individual differences in imagination hold for psychological outcomes is currently limited," note two researchers who have created a new psychometric test – the Imaginative Behaviour Engagement Scale (IBES) – for measuring how much imagination a person has, and then used it to investigate whether, as some earlier work hinted, having a stronger imagination might aid learning and creativity.

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