Using multiple devices at once is causing your memory to fail, study finds

A Stanford study explores the effect of multitasking on memory in young adults.

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  • The study explores the effect on memory of media multitasking as one's attention flits from place to place onscreen.
  • Participants' focus was tracked by observation of their pupil size and brain activity.
  • Remembering something is less likely when you're not really paying attention to your experience with it.
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Study finds hard physical labor raises risk for dementia

Work that can break down the body can also break down the mind.

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  • A new study out of Denmark finds that physical laborers are at an elevated risk of dementia.
  • These findings hold even when other health factors are accounted for.
  • The study also suggests that exercise can help reduce the risk of memory loss.
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New brain scan analysis tool can detect early signs of dementia

Researchers develop the first objective tool for assessing the onset of cognitive decline through the measurement of white spots in the brain.

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  • MRI brain scans may show white spots that scientists believe are linked to cognitive decline.
  • Experts have had no objective means of counting and measuring these lesions.
  • A new tool counts white spots and also cleverly measures their volumes.
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  • A new study found that weekly 15-minute "awe walks" have positive effects on mental health.
  • Volunteers reported higher levels of gratitude and compassion after eight weeks of these short walks.
  • Researchers believe this low-cost intervention could help prevent cognitive decline in older adults.
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The surprising future of vaccine technology

We owe a lot to vaccines and the scientists that develop them. But we've only just touched the surface of what vaccines can do.

  • "Vaccines are the best thing science has ever given us," says Larry Brilliant, founding president and acting chairman of Skoll Global Threats. From smallpox, to Ebola, to polio, scientists have successful fought viruses and saved millions of lives. So what's next?
  • As Covaxx (formerly United Neuroscience) cofounder Lou Reese explains in this video, the issue with vaccines is that they don't work against "non-external threats." This is a problem, especially now when internal threats (things that cause cancers, Alzheimer's, diabetes, and other chronic illnesses) are killing people more than external threats like viruses.
  • The future of vaccine tech, which scientists are already working toward today, is developing safe vaccines to eradicate these destructive internal agents without harming our bodies in the process.


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