This map is alive with the beauty of lighthouse signals

The unique light signatures of nautical beacons translate into hypnotic cartography.

Credit: Geodienst – Lights at Sea
  • Many of the world's 23,000 lighthouses feature a distinct combination of color, frequency, and range.
  • These unique light signatures help ships verify their positions and safeguard maritime traffic.
  • But they also translate into this map, visualizing the ingenuity and courage of lighthouse builders and keepers.

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The Christian church so holy that Muslims hold its keys

Six denominations share the Holy Sepulcher, but not all between them is peace and love.

Credit: Emmanuel Dunand via AFP / Getty Images
  • The Church of the Holy Sepulcher is not just the holiest site in Christianity; it is also emblematic of the religion's deep divisions.
  • As the map below shows, six denominations each control part of the church, with only some parts held in common.
  • Each "territory" is jealously guarded and sometimes fought over. The church's keys are held by… two Muslim families.
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How Europe will beat China on batteries

Map shows Europe's imminent Great Leap Forward in battery cell production

Credit: CIC energiGUNE
  • China produces 80 percent of electric vehicle batteries.
  • To achieve battery independence, Europe is ramping up production.
  • And the U.S.? Action is needed, and quick.
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How the Yazoo Land Scandal changed American history

Without the now-obscure land investment affair, Georgia might have been a "super state."

Credit: New Georgia Encyclopedia via public domain
  • Few people today are familiar with the Yazoo Land Scandal, which broke in the mid-1790s.
  • Yet it sent shockwaves through American public life, influencing politics, law, and even geography.
  • Without it, Georgia could have been a "super state" — and the Trail of Tears might not have happened.
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How Atlantic City inspired the Monopoly board

The popular game has a backstory rife with segregation, inequality, intellectual theft, and outlandish political theories.

Credit: Davis DeBard, with kind permission.
  • The streets on a classic Monopoly board were lifted from Atlantic City.
  • Here's what it looks like if we transport those places back onto a map.
  • Monopoly started out as its opposite: a game explaining the evil of monopolies.
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