Insects on Mars? Ohio scientist claims NASA images show life on red planet.

Entomologist William Romoser of Ohio University says NASA images depict insect- and reptile-like creatures on Mars.

Image source: NASA/JPL; William Romose / Ohio University
  • Entomologist William Romoser gave a presentation this week in which he claimed NASA photos show evidence of creatures, some still living, on the red planet.
  • Romoser has worked as a professor of entomology at Ohio University for four decades.
  • It's likely that the real phenomenon in Romoser's work is pareidolia — the tendency to "see" recognizable shapes among random visual data.
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Forgotten Nazi pesticide rediscovered — it was safer than DDT

For decades, Americans sprayed the notorious pesticide DDT all over their homes and fields. But it turns out we may have known about — and ignored — a safer alternative used by the Nazi regime.

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  • DDT, or dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, was an extremely popular pesticide during World War II up until the '70s, when it was banned.
  • DDT was believed to be extremely safe, but it turns out this was only due to enthusiasm for the pesticide drummed up by its efficacy during World War II.
  • Researchers have uncovered a far more effective pesticide that Allied forces wound up ignoring, in part because of its association with the German forces.
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Cockroaches are evolving to become invincible

They're hiding in your house, carrying germs, and now there's virtually no way to kill them.

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  • Not only are German cockroaches a major health concern, but they reproduce rapidly and are notoriously difficult to eradicate.
  • A new study shows that their quick reproductive cycles means that they quickly develop resistances to pesticides, to the point where pesticides alone are effectively useless.
  • The study highlights the importance of integrated pest management, such as keeping a clean house and combining different tactics to keep the critters at bay.
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Photo: Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images
  • Researchers in the Czech Republic ranked 25 animals we fear most in a new online survey.
  • While predatory animals evoke fear, they rarely raise our sense of disgust.
  • By contrast, parasites, spiders, and snakes make us fearful and repulsed.
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Forget the Anthropocene: We’ve entered the synthetic age

Synthetic biology is changing the way the planet works.

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One fact about our time is becoming increasingly well-known. No matter how far you travel, no matter in which direction you point, there is nowhere on Earth that remains free from the traces of human activity.

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