New study argues that migrating from cities, not travel bans, slows spread of disease

Of course, it's all about where you move. The authors argue that it needs to be less populous regions.

Credit: Christian Schwier / Adobe Stock
  • Moving from densely-populated urban regions is more effective in stopping the spreading of disease than closing borders.
  • Two researchers from Spain and Italy ran 10,000 simulations to discover that travel bans are ultimately ineffective.
  • Smaller cities might suffer high rates of infection, but the nation overall could benefit from this model.
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Why Erdogan wants to turn Istanbul into an island

'Kanal Istanbul' would create a second Bosporus – and immortalize its creator.

Image: Randam, CC BY-SA 4.0 (alteration by Ruland Kolen)
  • The Bosporus is three times busier than the Suez Canal, and getting worse.
  • To resolve marine congestion, Turkey wants to build a 'second Bosporus'.
  • The controversial project would alter local geography – and may have unintended consequences.

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Why virtual reality is necessary on a planet of 11 billion

Virtual reality is more than a trick. It's a solution to big problems.

  • According to projections shared by the UN, Earth's population is expected to reach 9.7 billion in 2050. By the year 2100, that number could increase to 11 billion. Virtual reality will be necessary to reduce the waste of such a large population in industries like transport, retail, and manufacturing.
  • As an existing technology, there is a lot that virtual reality can do: rich and immersive environments, heightened storytelling, emotionally resonant experiences, and increased productivity in retail. But it's only in its infancy.
  • As the world's population continues to grow, the technology will need to evolve to facilitate a larger network of users, and developers will have to think harder about the technological potential and the ethical, neurological, and emotional side effects.

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Water heist: Up to half of the world's supply is being stolen, study finds

A new study examines the under-researched area of water theft around the world.

Image source: Dan Gold/Unsplash
  • From 30% to 50% of the world's water is illegally or improperly taken.
  • Agriculture industries are implicated in the majority of water theft.
  • In some areas, it's so normal that it's barely noticed.

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Study details the negative environmental impact of online shopping

Frequent shopping for single items adds to our carbon footprint.

Photo by George Frey/Getty Images
  • A new study shows e-commerce sites like Amazon leave larger greenhouse gas footprints than retail stores.
  • Ordering online from retail stores has an even smaller footprint than going to the store yourself.
  • Greening efforts by major e-commerce sites won't curb wasteful consumer habits. Consolidating online orders can make a difference.
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