New study argues that migrating from cities, not travel bans, slows spread of disease

Of course, it's all about where you move. The authors argue that it needs to be less populous regions.

Credit: Christian Schwier / Adobe Stock
  • Moving from densely-populated urban regions is more effective in stopping the spreading of disease than closing borders.
  • Two researchers from Spain and Italy ran 10,000 simulations to discover that travel bans are ultimately ineffective.
  • Smaller cities might suffer high rates of infection, but the nation overall could benefit from this model.
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A normal tourist map, "but everything is negative"

'Critical Tourist Map of Oslo' offers uniquely dark perspective on Norway's capital.

Credit: Markus Moestue
  • Your standard tourist map is irrepressibly positive about its location—but not this one.
  • Norwegian activist/artist Markus Moestue reveals the dark and shameful sides of Oslo.
  • He hopes his 'Critical Tourist Map' will inspire others to reveal the dark side of their cities.
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How maps confirm anti-migrant bias

'Battlefield maps' show continent under attack from hostile invaders.

Image: De Correspondent, reproduced with kind permission.
  • Maps aren't objective. And migration maps aren't innocent.
  • Consciously or not, their content and form can confirm anti-migrant prejudices.
  • Alternative mapping options are available – but perhaps the answer isn't a map at all.
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Politics really do alter your perception of reality

According to Harvard economists, Democrats and Republicans both perceive reality very wrong.

  • A working paper by Harvard economists shows how political perceptions deform our understanding of otherwise verifiable facts.
  • Both Democrat and Republicans overestimate social mobility, underestimate the top tax bracket, and have no clue what's happening with foreign-born citizens.
  • The researchers hope their findings will help us understand how to intervene in the cycle of misinformation.
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    Are these the fracture lines that will break the EU?

    Europe's border closures due to coronavirus go against a fundamental freedom enshrined in the Schengen Agreement.

    Image: Political Geography Now - base map by Ssolberj (CC BY-SA 3.0)
    • Most EU members have shut their borders to limit coronavirus infection.
    • While understandable, it also goes against one of Europe's most fundamental freedoms.
    • In the longer run, these border closures could threaten the very existence of the EU itself.

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