Asteroid impact: NASA simulation shows we are sitting ducks

Even with six months' notice, we can't stop an incoming asteroid.

Credit: NASA/JPL
  • At an international space conference, attendees took part in an exercise that imagined an asteroid crashing into Earth.
  • With the object first spotted six months before impact, attendees concluded that there was insufficient time for a meaningful response.
  • There are an estimated 25,000 near-Earth objects potentially threatening our planet.
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Scientists test how to deflect asteroids with nuclear blasts

A study looks at how to use nuclear detonations to prevent asteroids from hitting Earth.

Credit: Adobe Stock
  • Researchers studied strategies that could deflect a large asteroid from hitting Earth.
  • They focused on the effect of detonating a nuclear device near an asteroid.
  • Varying the amount and location of the energy released could affect the deflection.
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The universe has a Hubble constant problem

Differences in the way that the Hubble constant—which measures the rate of cosmic expansion—are measured have profound implications for the future of cosmology.

Credit: LUIS ACOSTA via Getty Images
  • The Hubble constant is used to estimate the rate of expansion of the universe.
  • There are two different ways to calculate its value, but they give different results.
  • The difference may give physicists an opening to find new cosmic laws, but there is huge uncertainty about which path to take in finding them.
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VALENTIN FLAURAUD/AFP via Getty Images
When Cern's gargantuan accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), fired up ten years ago, hopes abounded that new particles would soon be discovered that could help us unravel physics' deepest mysteries.
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‘Smoking gun’ dark matter signature possibly identified

Researchers propose a new method that could definitively prove the existence of dark matter.

Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, Susan Stolovy (SSC/Caltech) et al.
  • Scientists identified a data signature for dark matter that can potentially be detected by experiments.
  • The effect they found is a daily "diurnal modulation" in the scattering of particles.
  • Dark matter has not yet been detected experimentally.
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