There is no dark matter. Instead, information has mass, physicist says

Is information the fifth form of matter?

Photo: Shutterstock
  • Researchers have been trying for over 60 years to detect dark matter.
  • There are many theories about it, but none are supported by evidence.
  • The mass-energy-information equivalence principle combines several theories to offer an alternative to dark matter.
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The hunt for the 'angel particle' continues

In 2017, researchers believed they had found evidence for the elusive Majorana fermion. Now, a new study found that the exotic class of particles may still be confined to theory.

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  • In 2017, researchers believed they had found evidence for the so-called "angel particle"; that is, a Majorana fermion.
  • Majorana fermions differ from regular fermions in that they are their own antiparticles.
  • New research shows that the previous finding was due to an error in the scientists' experimental device. Thus, it's back to the drawing board in the search for the Majorana fermion.
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What can old stars teach us about the birth of our galaxy?

These needles in the vast galactic haystack take more effort to find, but they help piece together our origins.

  • With billions of stars in our galaxy, why should astronomers seek out the oldest ones?
  • Age-dating stars is a complicated process, so astronomers use chemical compositions, telescopes, and prisms to determine the age of these ancient stars.
  • Some telescopes used for this purpose are in extremely remote places, where you can observe the bright band of the Milky Way with the naked eye.
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Mystery effect speeds up the universe – not dark energy, says study

Russian astrophysicists propose the Casimir Effect causes the universe's expansion to accelerate.

Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Jeremy Schnittman
  • Astrophysicists from Russia propose a theory that says dark energy doesn't exist.
  • Instead, the scientists think the Casimir Effect creates repulsion.
  • This effect causes the expansion of the universe to accelerate.
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Scientists race to use zero gravity to kill the worst cancers

A 2020 space mission wants to use zero gravity to disable some of the hardest cancers to fight.

Left: U.S. Air Force photo/Heidi Hunt). Right: Source Dr. Raowf Guirguis. National Cancer Institute
  • An Australian research mission, launched in 2020 by Elon Musk's SpaceX, will study effects of zero gravity on four cancers.
  • Other missions with similar objectives are set to launch in 2022 aboard the new China Space Station.
  • In earlier experiments, scientists found that microgravity can kill cancer cells.
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