China’s most important border is imaginary: the Hu Line

First drawn in 1935, Hu Line illustrates persistent demographic split – how Beijing deals with it will determine the country's future.

Credit: Tomaatje12, CC0 1.0 – Public domain.
  • In 1935, demographer Hu Huanyong drew a line across a map of China.
  • The 'Hu Line' illustrated a remarkable divide in China's population distribution.
  • That divide remains relevant, not just for China's present but also for its future.

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Who were the most legendary ancient rulers of all time?

From Ramses II to Alexander the Great, these leaders helped shaped the world we know today.

Karl Oderich, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
  • We often dismiss ancient history and the people in it as too long past to be noteworthy.
  • Some early rulers were so iconic that their names and works passed into legend and influenced others for centuries.
  • Every person on this list contributed to the world you live in today.
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What is the ‘self’? The 3 layers of your identity.

Answering the question of who you are is not an easy task. Let's unpack what culture, philosophy, and neuroscience have to say.

  • Who am I? It's a question that humans have grappled with since the dawn of time, and most of us are no closer to an answer.
  • Trying to pin down what makes you you depends on which school of thought you prescribe to. Some argue that the self is an illusion, while others believe that finding one's "true self" is about sincerity and authenticity.
  • In this video, author Gish Jen, Harvard professor Michael Puett, psychotherapist Mark Epstein, and neuroscientist Sam Harris discuss three layers of the self, looking through the lens of culture, philosophy, and neuroscience.
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Study finds matriarchal societies are good for women's health

A study of the Mosuo women, known for their matriarchy, suggests that gender roles can influence our health outcomes.

Credit: mentatdgt from Pexels
  • An isolated ethnic group in China maintains a matriarchal society, much to the benefit of their health.
  • The Mosuo women were not only healthier than women living under patriarchy, but were healthier than the men too.
  • The findings support the idea that having a degree of autonomy and resource control is good for your health
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Live on Monday: Does the US need one billion people?

What would happen if you tripled the US population? Matthew Yglesias and moderator Charles Duhigg explore the idea on Big Think Live.

Is immigration key to bolstering the American economy? Could having one billion Americans secure the US's position as the global superpower?

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