Nutrisystem review: The key to losing weight—and keeping it off

Nutrisystem is a smarter weight-loss program that users enjoy.

Credit: Nutrisystem
  • The societal and economic consequences of obesity cannot be ignored.
  • The economic impact is up to $190 billion every year in America.
  • Americans spend up to $2.5 billion each year on popular weight-loss programs.
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Your body image can be influenced by smells and sounds

Research finds that our sense of self can be manipulated by certain smells and sounds.

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  • Researchers find that there are smells that make us feel thinner and lighter, and other smells that do the opposite.
  • The sounds of our footsteps can have a similar effect.
  • The researchers suggest that sensory stimuli play a part in our self-image and may be subject to beneficial manipulation.
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Man whose stomach brewed beer is cured—by a poop transplant​

The human body is endlessly fascinating.

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  • Last year, it was reported that a Belgian man arrested for drunk driving brewed the alcohol in his own gut.
  • The disorder, auto-brewery syndrome, occurred after he took a round of antibiotics.
  • He was cured after a fecal donation from his daughter.
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New guidelines redefine 'obesity' to curb fat shaming

Is focusing solely on body mass index the best way for doctor to frame obesity?

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  • New guidelines published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal argue that obesity should be defined as a condition that involves high body mass index along with a corresponding physical or mental health condition.
  • The guidelines note that classifying obesity by body mass index alone may lead to fat shaming or non-optimal treatments.
  • The guidelines offer five steps for reframing the way doctors treat obesity.
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New research shows that a 'cheat day' might not be that bad

The study was only conducted with already healthy men, however.

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  • A new study at the University of Bath found that binge eating on occasion doesn't have major metabolic consequences.
  • 14 healthy young men were instructed to eat pizza until full or to keep going until they couldn't eat another bite.
  • Their blood sugar levels were similar to having eaten normally and blood lipids levels were only slightly higher than normal.
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