Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

The hunger-boredom paradigm explained by scientists

Johns Hopkins University professor Susan Carnell explains the neuroscience behind eating out of boredom (and how to stop).

Photo by ViChizh on Shutterstock
  • True hunger builds gradually and can be satisfied by any source of food, while emotional eating (which includes eating out of boredom) is insatiable and generally leads to feelings of guilt or shame.
  • One 2015 study suggests we eat to escape the self-awareness that comes in moments of boredom or inactivity, while Johns Hopkins University professor Susan Carnell explains there may be a neuroscientific reason we eat to escape boredom.
  • Drinking water, occupying your brain with a hobby or craft, exercising or striking up a fun conversation with someone are all ways you can beat the boredom-hunger paradigm.
Keep reading Show less

Large study confirms diet linked to anxiety disorders

Once again, sugar-rich processed foods are shown to increase the likelihood of anxiety.

(Photo by Blake Nissen for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
  • Ten percent of the global population currently suffers from an anxiety disorder.
  • A Canadian-based team discovered a link between anxiety and high-sugar, processed foods.
  • Subjects whose diets were high in fruits and vegetables were less likely to suffer from such a disorder.
Keep reading Show less

Why overeating is an ecological nightmare

A new research article states that the obesity epidemic is affecting more than just waistlines.

Photo: Getty Images
  • While the cost of food waste is high, the environmental impact of obesity is even higher.
  • According to researchers in Italy, obesity results in an extra 140 billion tons of food consumption every year.
  • Obesity costs Americans $1.72 trillion in healthcare costs and is now the leading cause of death.
Keep reading Show less

High-fat diets change your brain, not just your body

Unhealthy diets cause the part of your brain responsible for appetite to become inflamed, encouraging further eating and obesity.

Photo by Miguel Andrade on Unsplash
  • Anyone who has tried to change their diet can tell you it's not as simple as simply waking up and deciding to eat differently.
  • New research sheds light on a possible explanation for this; high-fat diets can cause inflammation in the hypothalamus, which regulates hunger.
  • Mice fed high-fat diets tended to eat more and become obese due to this inflammation.
Keep reading Show less

Obesity is the leading cause of death in America. When will we talk about it?

Bill Maher called for fat shaming last week. His argument makes sense.

Photo by Francis Dean/Corbis via Getty Images
  • As the NY Times reports, obesity is the leading cause of death in America, costing the health care system $1.72 trillion.
  • Bill Maher called for fat shaming as a means of transforming the lethargic mindset about obesity.
  • When implemented properly, shame can be an important and powerful tool, writes NYU professor Jennifer Jacquet.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast