People who engage in fat-shaming tend to score high in this personality trait

A new study explores how certain personality traits affect individuals' attitudes on obesity in others.

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  • The study compared personality traits and obesity views among more than 3,000 mothers.
  • The results showed that the personality traits neuroticism and extraversion are linked to more negative views and behaviors related to obesity.
  • People who scored high in conscientiousness are more likely to experience "fat phobia.
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How your brain makes you overeat

Turns out the more we desire a food, the more we have to consume to feel satiated.

Muffins with chocolate chips. Woman taking a muffin (Photo by: Andia/UIG via Getty Images)
  • The brain's reward system releases dopamine when tasting food.
  • Researchers at Max Planck discovered a second dopamine release in the stomach, affecting higher cognitive functions.
  • The more we desire a food, the weaker the second release, which might lead to overeating.
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7 exercises to master in 2019

If you're not failing, you're not learning.

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  • Diversity in exercise is an essential component of a good fitness diet.
  • Constantly pushing your physical boundaries provides equally valuable neurological benefits.
  • These seven exercises and tools are worth integrating into your regimen in 2019.
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There was no relationship between obesity and poverty — until high-fructose corn syrup

A new study out of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville traces a disturbing correlation.

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  • Before 1990, there was no noticeable correlation between obesity and poverty.
  • Within a quarter-century, impoverished regions showed a massive uptick in obesity and type 1 diabetes.
  • Researchers chart the relationship between "food deserts" along with obesity levels.
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Psychological gym experiment proves the power of mind over matter

It isn't mind over matter as much as mind properly working with matter.

DENVER, CO - MAY 16: Brian and Monica Folts workout on treadmills at Colorado Athletic Club Tabor Center on May 16, 2018 in Denver, Colorado. The couple runs marathons and compete in Ironman triathlons and train on on treadmills. (Photo by RJ Sangosti/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
  • A new Stanford study finds believing you have genetic predispositions for obesity and low exercise endurance changes your physiology.
  • Participants told they had a protective obesity gene had a better response than those told they did not, even if they did not actually have the gene.
  • Runners performed poorly after learning they did not have the gene for endurance, even if they actually have the gene.
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