Man whose stomach brewed beer is cured—by a poop transplant​

The human body is endlessly fascinating.

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  • Last year, it was reported that a Belgian man arrested for drunk driving brewed the alcohol in his own gut.
  • The disorder, auto-brewery syndrome, occurred after he took a round of antibiotics.
  • He was cured after a fecal donation from his daughter.
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New guidelines redefine 'obesity' to curb fat shaming

Is focusing solely on body mass index the best way for doctor to frame obesity?

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  • New guidelines published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal argue that obesity should be defined as a condition that involves high body mass index along with a corresponding physical or mental health condition.
  • The guidelines note that classifying obesity by body mass index alone may lead to fat shaming or non-optimal treatments.
  • The guidelines offer five steps for reframing the way doctors treat obesity.
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Nutrisystem review: The key to losing weight—and keeping it off

Nutrisystem is a smarter weight-loss program that users enjoy.

Credit: Nutrisystem
  • The societal and economic consequences of obesity cannot be ignored.
  • The economic impact is up to $190 billion every year in America.
  • Americans spend up to $2.5 billion each year on popular weight-loss programs.
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New research shows that a 'cheat day' might not be that bad

The study was only conducted with already healthy men, however.

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  • A new study at the University of Bath found that binge eating on occasion doesn't have major metabolic consequences.
  • 14 healthy young men were instructed to eat pizza until full or to keep going until they couldn't eat another bite.
  • Their blood sugar levels were similar to having eaten normally and blood lipids levels were only slightly higher than normal.
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The hunger-boredom paradigm explained by scientists

Johns Hopkins University professor Susan Carnell explains the neuroscience behind eating out of boredom (and how to stop).

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  • True hunger builds gradually and can be satisfied by any source of food, while emotional eating (which includes eating out of boredom) is insatiable and generally leads to feelings of guilt or shame.
  • One 2015 study suggests we eat to escape the self-awareness that comes in moments of boredom or inactivity, while Johns Hopkins University professor Susan Carnell explains there may be a neuroscientific reason we eat to escape boredom.
  • Drinking water, occupying your brain with a hobby or craft, exercising or striking up a fun conversation with someone are all ways you can beat the boredom-hunger paradigm.
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