How antibiotics used in factory farming destroy our microbiomes

Good bacteria are our friends. We need to protect them.

  • More and more research nowadays links good gut flora to several health benefits, such as the inhibition of Alzheimer's to a fast metabolism.
  • Since we're over prescribed antibiotics, and because much of the meat we consume comes from animals that were fed antibiotics, we are destroying much of the good bacteria, and often at the risk — because of our diets — of replenishing them.
  • A well-rounded diet that's light in animal protein, high in macronutrients, and supplemented with a good intake of prebiotics can ensure we're keeping probiotics flourishing.

Scientists are killing superbugs with viruses

Fighting fire with fire.

Image source: Shutterstock
  • CDC estimates say that 154 million antibiotic prescriptions are given out each year, 30 percent of which are unnecessary.
  • The overuse of antibiotics have led to the rise of nigh-untreatable superbugs.
  • Phage therapy offers a promising new way to overcome antibiotic resistance, but it also comes with its own risks and challenges.
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Dead – yes, dead – tardigrade found beneath Antarctica

A completely unexpected discovery beneath the ice.

(Goldstein Lab/Wkikpedia/Tigerspaws/Big Think)
  • Scientists find remains of a tardigrade and crustaceans in a deep, frozen Antarctic lake.
  • The creatures' origin is unknown, and further study is ongoing.
  • Biology speaks up about Antarctica's history.
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Organisms living inside the Earth far outnumber all the humans, reveals study

Researchers find an amazing amount of often-weird forms of life below the planet's surface.

Credit: Gaetan Borgonie (Extreme Life Isyensya, Belgium).
  • Scientists found a rich ecosystem deep inside the planet.
  • The "deep biosphere" contains mostly bacteria and microbes.
  • The amount of life below the surface is hundreds of times greater than the combined weight of all the humans.
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The VP882 virus ‘eavesdrops’ on bacteria to kill

Scientists say the virus monitors bacterial chemical exchanges

Andreas Rentz/Getty Images
  • When bacteria broadcast their presence, bacteriophages may be listening
  • A stunning discovery of cross-domain communication
  • Research could lead to new, custom- targeted medicines
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