Do animals see the world the way we do?

We can't ask them, so scientists have devised an experiment.

Credit: sebastiangora/Roxana/Adobe Stock/Big Think
  • Humans have the capacity for conscious awareness of our visual world.
  • While all sighted animals respond to visual stimuli, we don't know if any of them consciously take note of what they're seeing in the way that we do.
  • Researchers from Yale have devised experiments that suggest that rhesus monkeys share this ability.

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Whales warned each other about hunters in the 19th century

Digitized logbooks from the 1800s reveal a steep decline in strike rate for whalers.

Credit: Morphart/Adobe Stock
  • Newly digitized whalers' logbooks allow researchers to analyze trends in 19th-century whaling.
  • The records show that whales soon learned to anticipate and evade predation from humans.
  • The behavioral changes suggest social learning at work since the change in their behavior occurred too quickly to be evolutionary.
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    Are geniuses real? The neuroscience and myths of visionaries

    Labeling thinkers like Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs as "other" may be stifling humanity's creative potential.

    • Revolutionary ideas and culture-shifting inventions are often credited to specific individuals, but how often do these "geniuses" actually operate in creative silos?
    • Tim Sanders, former chief strategy officer at Yahoo, argues that there are three myths getting in the way of innovative ideas and productive collaborations: the myths of the expert, the eureka moment, and the "lone inventor."
    • More than an innate quality reserved for an elite group, neuroscientist Heather Berlin and neurobiologist Joy Hirsch explain how creativity looks in the brain, and how given opportunity, resources, and attitude, we can all be like Bach, Beethoven, and Steve Jobs.

    Cephalopod aces 'marshmallow test' designed for eager children

    The famous cognition test was reworked for cuttlefish. They did better than expected.

    Credit: Hans Hillewaert via Wikicommons
    • Scientists recently ran the Stanford marshmallow experiment on cuttlefish and found they were pretty good at it.
    • The test subjects could wait up to two minutes for a better tasting treat.
    • The study suggests cuttlefish are smarter than you think but isn't the final word on how bright they are.
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    Pigs proven intelligent enough to play video games

    They did really well considering joysticks are not designed for oral use.

    Credits: Candace Croney, Eston Martz at Pennsylvania State University/Frontiers Science News
    • A quartet of porcine subjects at the Purdue Center for Animal Welfare Science learned to play a simple video game.
    • All of the pigs scored well at the games' hardest level.
    • Gaming skills were improved with human verbal and tactile encouragement.
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