NASA-funded scientist says 'MEGA drive' could enable interstellar travel

The drive would provide enough thrust for a spacecraft to travel near the speed of light using only electricity, says physicist Jim Woodward.

SSI: Space Studies Institute via YouTube
  • The thrust system utilizes piezoelectric crystals, which vibrate extremely rapidly when exposed to electric current.
  • Early tests have yielded mixed results, but Woodward and his colleagues say a recent breakthrough related to the design of the thruster mount greatly increased thrust.
  • Independent teams of scientists will likely test Woodward's design after the pandemic.
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New ‘bullet plane’ aims to make private flights affordable

Otto Aviation says the hourly cost of flying the new Celera 500L is about six times cheaper than conventional aircraft.

Otto Aviation
  • The unusual shape of Otto Aviation's Celera 500L was designed to maximize laminar flow.
  • Laminar flow is the smooth flow of air over an aircraft's wings, and optimizing laminar flow can make aircraft incredibly efficient.
  • The plane can hold up to six passengers, and is expected to hit commercial markets around 2025.
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ESA's 'interplanetary cargo ship' to carry Mars rocks to Earth in 2031

The Earth Return Orbiter is part of a long-term mission to search for ancient alien life on Mars.

ESA
  • On July 30, NASA is set to launch the Perseverance rover toward Mars on a mission to search for biosignatures of ancient life within the planet's Jerezo Crater.
  • The soil samples collected by the rover would then be launched from the Martian surface into orbit, where a European-made "cargo ship" will intercept the container.
  • The cargo ship — a satellite called the Earth Return Orbiter — could return the samples to Earth for further study by 2031.
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The world needs carbon-neutral flying. Here’s how to bring it one step closer.

We need electric planes, sustainable aviation fuels, and hybrid propulsion now, not later.

In the year when the Swedish word "flygskam" (flight-shaming) hit the news in Europe, public concern about carbon emissions from aviation is endangering the sector's social license to operate.

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FAA warns that illegal weaponized drones will incur a $25K fine

The FAA is not amused by flame-throwing drones.

Image source: ThrowFlame
  • Federal Aviation Administration publishes a notice warning the public not to weaponize their personal drones.
  • Doing so will result in a $25,000 fine per violation.
  • The FAA is keeping pace with the rapid development of this new and popular technology.
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