These 1,000 hexagons show how global wealth is distributed

A cartogram makes it easy to compare regional and national GDPs at a glance.

Credit: BerryBlue_BlueBerry, reproduced with kind permission
  • On these maps, each hexagon represents one-thousandth of the world's economy.
  • That makes it easy to compare the GDP of regions and nations across the globe.
  • There are versions for nominal GDP and GDP adjusted for purchasing power.
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Why American universities are the best in the world

American universities used to be small centers of rote learning, but three big ideas turned them into intellectual powerhouses.

Photo by Armin Rimoldi from Pexels
  • American universities used to be small denominational schools with little research output.
  • Competition between schools in the late 19th century drove many schools to innovate.
  • Today, America has many top universities and the lion's share of Nobel Prize winners.
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How Europe will beat China on batteries

Map shows Europe's imminent Great Leap Forward in battery cell production

Credit: CIC energiGUNE
  • China produces 80 percent of electric vehicle batteries.
  • To achieve battery independence, Europe is ramping up production.
  • And the U.S.? Action is needed, and quick.
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Rain, caves, and miracles: New study connects weather to ancient tales

A new study provides a possible scientific explanation for the existence of stories about ancient saints performing miracles with water.

Photo by Peter de Vink from Pexels
  • Ancient climate patterns can be determined by examining the ratios of various isotopes.
  • Isotopic signatures found in Italian cave stalagmites suggest that the Sixth Century was wetter than usual.
  • The study provides a partial explanation for the origin of stories about saints performing water miracles.
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    Is this Danish island soon coming to a coast near you?

    An artificial island in the North Sea is the biggest building project ever in Danish history - and could pave the way for many more.

    • In 1991, Denmark constructed the world's first offshore wind farm.
    • Now they're building an entire 'Energy Island' in the North Sea.
    • As the U.S. catches up, Danish know-how could soon come to America.
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