‘I’ll have what she’s having’ – how and why we copy the choices of others

The choice of flavor may be up to you, but the number of scoops will depend on your friends.

Imagine you're dining out at a casual restaurant with some friends. After looking over the menu, you decide to order the steak. But then, after a dinner companion orders a salad for their main course, you declare: “I'll have the salad too."

Keep reading Show less

Here’s how Aristotle can help you master the power of persuasion

Logos, pathos, and ethos can help you bring people over to your side.

Stock Montage/Getty Images

Persuasion is about so much more than just getting someone to see things your way. It can actually be a great tool to ease workplace stress — you can use it to get your team aligned around a goal.

Keep reading Show less

Exposing our hidden biases curbs their influence, new research suggests

Do you know the implicit biases you have? Here are some ways to find them out.

Image source: Hinterhaus Productions / Getty
  • A study finds that even becoming aware of your own implicit bias can help you overcome it.
  • We all have biases. Some of them are helpful — others not so much.
Keep reading Show less

8 ways to achieve self-actualization

The term "self-actualization" is often bandied about on the web, but how does one go about becoming self-actualized really?

Photo by Caleb George on Unsplash
  • Often, the term "self-actualization" is relegated to the realm of the theoretical.
  • However, Abraham Maslow, who incorporated the term in his famous hierarchy of needs, believed that there are 8 behaviors that can lead to self-actualization.
  • He stressed that everybody's version of self-actualization is different, but these 8 behaviors can encourage you to find your way to yours.
Keep reading Show less

Why speaking to yourself in the third person makes you wiser

Research suggests that you should adopt an ancient rhetorical method called 'illeism'.

We credit Socrates with the insight that 'the unexamined life is not worth living' and that to 'know thyself' is the path to true wisdom. But is there a right and a wrong way to go about such self-reflection?

Keep reading Show less