Study identifies animal species that may be susceptible to coronavirus

On the list of animals at risk are several endangered species.

Image source: Jorge Franganillo/Unsplash
  • SARS-CoV-2 enters our cells by binding with ACE2 receptors.
  • A study finds many animals may provide a similar point of entry for the infection.
  • COVID-19 has already been seen in a range of non-humans.

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Eyes painted on cow butts thwart lion attacks

An experiment in Botswana suggests a non-lethal deterrent for predatory lions.

Image source: Ben Yexly/UNSW
  • Lions help maintain balance in their ecosystems, but they also kill cattle.
  • The big cats are ambush predators who depend on the element of surprise.
  • In an experiment, eyes painted on cow backsides appear to deter lions from attacking.
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The Anthropause is here: COVID-19 reduced Earth's vibrations by 50 percent

The planet is making a lot less noise during lockdown.

Photo by Eric Rojas/Getty Images
  • A team of researchers found that Earth's vibrations were down 50 percent between March and May.
  • This is the quietest period of human-generated seismic noise in recorded history.
  • The researchers believe this helps distinguish between natural vibrations and human-created vibrations.
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Why the U.S. Space Force just hired this handsome horse

America's Space Force has acquired a horse for an important mission.

Credit: U.S. Space Force
  • U.S. Space Force has acquired a new horse named Ghost.
  • The horse is part of the Conservation Military Working Horse program.
  • The horses help patrol a large territory, supporting threatened species.
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Stone stacking destroys the environment for clicks and likes

Stone stackers enjoy the practice as a peaceful challenge, but scientists warn that moving small stones has mountainous consequences.

  • In recent years, stone stacks have become a popular pastime on social media and in our national parks.
  • Scientists and conservationists warn that such stacks cause ecological damage and risk the survival of many endemic plant and animal species.
  • The problem is one of scale: The more popular the pastime becomes, the great the damage to our natural parks and reserves.
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