I don’t believe in blind idealism: An interview with Katarzyna Boni

The author of "Auroville: The City Made of Dreams" talks about the difficulties of establishing (and writing about) utopian societies.

ARUN SANKAR/AFP via Getty Images
Is it possible to bring a utopia to life? When searching for an ideal world, do we part with reality or maybe give it a new shape?
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Did our early ancestors boil their food in hot springs?

Scientists have found evidence of hot springs near sites where ancient hominids settled, long before the control of fire.

Ryan Pierse/Getty Images
Some of the oldest remains of early human ancestors have been unearthed in Olduvai Gorge, a rift valley setting in northern Tanzania where anthropologists have discovered fossils of hominids that existed 1.8 million years ago.
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8 must-read books on the psychedelic experience

Psychedelics are going mainstream. Here's your reading list.

Photo: Yellow_Cat / Shutterstock
  • Hundreds of millions of dollars are pouring into psychedelics companies right now.
  • With loosening restrictions on clinical research, new therapeutic modalities are being investigated for anxiety, depression, and more.
  • The psychedelic literature is rich with anecdotal accounts and clinical studies.
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Scientists solve the origin of Stonehenge’s sarsen stones

Most of Stonehenge's megaliths, called sarens, came from West Woods, Wiltshire.

  • Researchers have known Stonehenge's smaller bluestones came from Preseli Hills, Wales, but the source of its sarsens has remained a mystery.
  • Using chemical analysis, scientists found a matching source at West Woods, approximately 16 miles north of the World Heritage Site.
  • But mysteries remain, such as why that site was chosen.
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48,000-year-old bone arrowheads and jewelry discovered in Sri Lankan cave

Artifacts uncovered in southeast Asia offer clues on early complex human cultures.

Langley et al., 2020
  • Archaeologists discovered a trove of bone tools used roughly 48,000 years ago in a Sri Lankan cave.
  • Uncovered artifacts include the earliest known bow-and-arrow devices found out of Africa, weaving utensils, and decorative beads chiseled from the tips of marine snail shells.
  • The findings underline the necessity of looking for early Homo sapien innovation in regions outside of the grasslands and coasts of Africa or Europe, where much of the research has been focused.
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