Truth vs Reality: How we evolved to survive, not to see what’s really there

Take the circumstances in your life seriously, but not literally. Here's why.

  • Galileo was quite controversial, in part, because he argued that Earth moved around the sun, despite people's senses deluding them that the world was static.
  • Evolution may have primed us to see the world in terms of payoffs rather than absolute reality — this has actually helped us survive. Those who win payoffs are more likely to pass on their genes, which encode these strategies to get to the "next level" of life.
  • It's important to listen to people's objections because they may bring something to your attention outside your ken. Learn from them to make your ideas sharper.
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Scientists developing controllable contact lens that zooms in

They're made from stretchy, electroactive polymer films.

Pixabay
  • The contact lens is made mainly from stretchy, electroactive polymer films.
  • It's able to recognize subtle electrooculographic signals that we generate in the tissues near the eye.
  • Samsung also recently filed a patent to develop what appear to be smart contact lenses.
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Watch: Richard Feynman makes scientific concepts beautifully simple

Few could match the famous physicist in his ability to communicate difficult-to-understand concepts in a simple and warm fashion.

  • Richard Feynman was a renowned physicist who conducted legendary work on quantum physics, the Manhattan Project, and investigating the Challenger explosion.
  • Later in life, however, he became best known for his education work, gaining the nickname "the Great Explainer."
  • His series, Fun to Imagine, works as an excellent primer to Feynman's unique educational style. Here are 9 science lessons he covers in his series.
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Is this why time speeds up as we age?

We take fewer mental pictures per second.

Photo by Djim Loic on Unsplash
  • Recent memories run in our brains like sped-up old movies.
  • In childhood, we capture images in our memory much more quickly.
  • The complexities of grownup neural pathways are no match for the direct routes of young brains.
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Brazilian scientists produce mini-brains with eyes

Using a new process, a mini-brain develops retinal cells.

  • Mini-brains, or "neural organoids," are at the cutting edge of medical research.
  • This is the first one that's started developing eyes.
  • Stem cells are key to the growing of organoids of various body parts.
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