Hues of our own: How we perceive color

Is your red the same as mine? Probably not.

Photo by JD Weiher on Unsplash

Each of us lives in our own multi-colored universe. And there's scientific proof of it.

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By the age of 3, children appreciate nature's fractal patterns

Fractal patterns are noticed by people of all ages, even small children, and have significant calming effects.

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  • A new study from the University of Oregon found that, by the age of three, children understand and prefer nature's fractal patterns.
  • A "fractal" is a pattern that the laws of nature repeat at different scales. Exact fractals are ordered in such a way that the same basic pattern repeats exactly at every scale, like the growth spiral of a plant, for example.
  • Separate studies have proven that exposure to fractal patterns in nature can reduce your stress levels significantly.
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Colors evoke similar emotions around the world, survey finds

Certain colors are globally linked to certain feelings, the study reveals.

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  • Color psychology is often used in marketing to alter your perception of products and services.
  • Various studies and experiments across multiple years have given us more insight into the link between personality and color.
  • The results of a new study spanning 6 continents (30 nations) shows universal correlations between colors and emotions around the globe.
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Brain study finds that humans are born wired for reading letters and words

The area of the brain that recognizes letters and words is ready for action right from the start.

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  • There's an area of the brain specializing in the recognition of letters and words.
  • Neuroscientists wonder how this faculty develops since it would not be a trait associated with survival.
  • fMRI scans reveal that this region is already connected to the brain's language centers in newborns.
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Study links 'sun-seeking behavior' to genes involved in addiction

A large-scale study from King's College London explores the link between genetics and sun-seeking behaviors.

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  • There are a number of physical and mental health benefits to sun exposure, such as boosted vitamin D and serotonin levels and stronger bones.
  • Addictions are multi-step conditions that, by definition, require exposure to the addictive agent and have also been proven to have a genetic factor. Countless people are exposed to addictive things, but not all become addicted. This is because of the genetic component of addiction.
  • This large-scale study explores the link between sun-seeking behaviors and the genetic markers for addiction.
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