The psychology of infidelity: Why do we cheat?

Infidelity, an inherently selfish behavior, has been analyzed by researchers to help us understand why people cheat in relationships.

Photo by Tero Vesalainen on Shutterstock
  • Results of a 2005 study show that there is a significant difference between cheaters and non-cheaters when it comes to the Big Five model of personality traits.
  • Poor self control, selfishness, anger, boredom, and attention-seeking are the most common reasons a person is unfaithful in their relationship.
  • However, a 2018 study suggests that even infidelity, which is inherently a selfish behavior, is more than it seems - requiring an in-depth look at both the personality traits in each person in the relationship as well as the dynamic between them.
Keep reading Show less

The signs of unhealthy power dynamics in a relationship—and how to even them out

Is there a power imbalance in your relationship? You can find out by answering 28 simple questions.

Photo by fizkes on Shutterstock
  • The balance of power in relationships is an ever-changing status that deserves to be carefully monitored and cared for.
  • Negative balances of power can be defined by three different relationship dynamics: demand/withdrawal, distancer/pursuer and the fear/shame dynamic.
  • Researchers have conducted several studies and come up with a list of questions that can help you determine if your relationship has a negative power imbalance.
Keep reading Show less

Using the logic of neuroscience to heal from a breakup

Healing from a break-up should be taken as seriously as healing from a broken arm, says psychiatrist Dr. Guy Winch.

Photo by Ken Stocker on Shutterstock
  • According to a study from anthropologist Dr. Helen Fisher, when humans fall in love, regions of the brain that are rich in dopamine (a neurotransmitter that plays a key role in feeling pleasure) light up and parts of the brain that are used in fear and social judgment are operating at lower rates.
  • The surge and decline of hormones in our brains when we experience a breakup are also similar to those felt when withdrawing from an addiction to drugs - and the pain felt during a breakup has appeared on MRI scans as similar to the physical pain felt with a severe burn or broken arm.
  • Understanding the neuroscience of heartbreak can help us better understand how to heal from the physical and emotional pain caused by a breakup, according to well-known psychiatrist and author Dr. Guy Winch.
Keep reading Show less

So grateful for my ex: Men hold more positive views of former partners than women do

Many people often continue to harbour positive feelings towards their exes long after the relationship is over.

Break-ups are always hard, with love and companionship giving way to feelings of resentment and the souring of once treasured memories.

Keep reading Show less

Wedding bells or single again: Psychology predicts where your relationship is headed

To know your relationship's fate, the ups and downs may matter more than its quality at one specific moment.

John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images

Is he or she the one? You know… the one to introduce to my parents, the one to move in with, the one to start a family with, the one to marry? At some point in every dating relationship, you ask yourself some version of these questions.

Keep reading Show less