Some sleep is worse than no sleep for keeping fear in check

Getting plenty of sleep just became even more important.

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  • A new study finds that people without sleep fare better in learning what to fear and not fear than those getting only some sleep.
  • Test subjects learned to associate colors with electric shocks, but only some unlearned it.
  • The findings could be used to help create new treatments for those at risk of PTSD or anxiety.
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Remote education is decreasing anxiety, increasing wellbeing for some students

A recent NIHR report found that students with previously low connectedness scores saw improvement in well-being and eased anxiety.

  • With coronavirus resurging in Europe and the United States, parents are worried about their children's well-being and mental health.
  • A report from the U.K.'s NIHR extends some hope; it found that students' mental health is improving while remote learning.
  • Parents will continue play an important role in supporting their children's mental health.
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What we want from horror is a cardiac jump-start, study suggests

A study looks at the ingredients of a good scare.

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  • Researchers from a Danish Recreational Fear Lab investigate fear's Goldilocks zone.
  • People love a good fright that stops short of being genuinely worrisome.
  • The study tracks the heart rates of haunted-house visitors.
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    Study: 75 percent of women executives have experienced imposter syndrome

    A new survey also found that women executives believe imposter syndrome to be common among women in corporate America.

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  • A new survey found that three-fourths of women executives have experienced imposter syndrome and believe they put more pressure on themselves to succeed than men.
  • Imposter syndrome was first identified in highly successful women in 1978.
  • Imposter syndrome is a widespread phenomenon, but there are ways to ease the agony.
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    How the media helped fuel the anti-vaxx movement

    Andrew Wakefield turned away from science and to the tabloids to spread his fabricated data.

    Photo: In the Light Photography / Shutterstock
    • Investigative journalist Brian Deer has published a new book on anti-vaxx ringleader, Andrew Wakefield.
    • Discredited in the science community, Wakefield turned to the media to share his anti-vaxx propaganda.
    • The disbarred doctor fabricated results and filed for his own vaccine patents, Deer reports.
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