Finally, a world map for bees

First picture of worldwide bee distribution fills knowledge gaps and may help protect species.

Credit: Current Biology, open access
  • The first global picture of the world's 20,000 bee species holds a few surprises.
  • Unlike most other species, bees are less abundant at the tropics and more in dry, temperate zones.
  • Bees are endangered but crucial as pollinators – this study will help protect them.

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    NOAA discovers a new, beautifully weird sea creature

    Exceptionally high-quality videos allow scientists to formally introduce a remarkable new comb jelly.

    • Gorgeous simplicity characterizes the comb jelly recently discovered by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries.
    • The small denizen of the deep was spotted three times beneath the waters off Puerto Rico.
    • Though it's unusual to formally identify an animal strictly based on video observations, the quality of NOAA's video made it possible in a case where there's no better alternative.
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    A Chinese plant has evolved to hide from humans

    Researchers document the first example of evolutionary changes in a plant in response to humans.

    Credit: MEDIAIMAG/Adobe Stock
    • A plant coveted in China for its medicinal properties has developed camouflage that makes it less likely to be spotted and pulled up from the ground.
    • In areas where the plant isn't often picked, it's bright green. In harvested areas, it's now a gray that blends into its rocky surroundings.
    • Herbalists in China have been picking the Fritillaria dealvayi plant for 2,000 years.
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    9 of the most shocking facts about global extinction - and how to stop it

    Across the world, wildlife is under severe threat.

    Photo by redcharlie on Unsplash

    Earth's fate and the devastation of the natural world were recently put under the microscope with the release of Sir David Attenborough's Netflix documentary A Life On Our Planet.

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    AI reveals the Sahara actually has millions of trees

    A study finds 1.8 billion trees and shrubs in the Sahara desert.

    Credit: bassvdo/Shutterstock
    • AI analysis of satellite images sees trees and shrubs where human eyes can't.
    • At the western edge of the Sahara is more significant vegetation than previously suspected.
    • Machine learning trained to recognize trees completed the detailed study in hours.
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