BDSM therapy: Are there therapeutic and relational benefits to being submissive?

In-depth research suggests BDSM practitioners can experience altered states of consciousness that can be therapeutic.

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  • BDSM is an acronym encompassing a variety of sexual practices that include: bondage/discipline, dominance/submission, and sadism/masochism. The practice of BDSM usually consists of partners taking on specific roles in which one partner is dominant and the other is submissive.
  • BDSM practitioners (individuals who frequently engage in BDSM play) can experience various mental health benefits from engaging in their scenes.
  • According to the research, subspace is often characterized by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the release of epinephrine and endorphins, and a subsequent period of non-verbal, deep relaxation.
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How leaders influence people to believe

Being a leader is about more than the job title. You have to earn respect.

  • What does it take to be a leader? For Northwell Health president and CEO Michael Dowling, having an Ivy League degree and a large office is not what makes a leader. Leadership requires something much less tangible: influence.
  • True leaders inspire people to follow and believe in them and the organization's mission by being passionate, having humility, and being a real part of the team. This is especially important in a field like health care, where guidance and teamwork save lives.
  • Authenticity is also key. "Don't pretend, be real," says Dowling. "Accept your vulnerabilities, accept your weaknesses, know where your strengths are, and get people to belong."
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Can scientists find the ‘holy grail’ of Alzheimer’s research?

Clinical trials at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research focus on stabilizing cognitive loss and alleviating the psychotic symptoms that change our loved ones.

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  • Alzheimer's is a neurodegenerative disease that is estimated to affect twice as many Americans by 2050, making it a troubling eventuality for many young adults.
  • There's currently no cure for Alzheimer's, but clinical trials of immunotherapy approaches show promise.
  • Immunotherapies may also alleviate the psychotic symptoms of Alzheimer's, like agitation, aggression, and paranoia.
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Here’s how you know when someone’s lying to your face

When someone is lying to you personally, you may be able to see what they're doing.

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  • A study uses motion-capture to assess the physical interaction between a liar and their victim.
  • Liars unconsciously coordinate their movements to their listener.
  • The more difficult the lie, the more the coordination occurs.
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Why it's important to admit when you're wrong

Psychologists point to specific reasons that make it hard for us to admit our wrongdoing.

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  • Admitting mistakes can be very difficult for our ego and self-image, say psychologists.
  • Refusing to own up to guilt boosts the ego and can feel more satisfying.
  • Not acknowledging you are wrong can lead to psychological issues and ruined relationships.
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