How romantic love is like addiction

Might as well face it, you're addicted to love.

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  • Many writers have commented on the addictive qualities of love. Science agrees.
  • The reward system of the brain reacts similarly to both love and drugs
  • Someday, it might be possible to treat "love addiction."
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The science of sex, love, attraction, and obsession

The symbol for love is the heart, but the brain may be more accurate.

  • How love makes us feel can only be defined on an individual basis, but what it does to the body, specifically the brain, is now less abstract thanks to science.
  • One of the problems with early-stage attraction, according to anthropologist Helen Fisher, is that it activates parts of the brain that are linked to drive, craving, obsession, and motivation, while other regions that deal with decision-making shut down.
  • Dr. Fisher, professor Ted Fischer, and psychiatrist Gail Saltz explain the different types of love, explore the neuroscience of love and attraction, and share tips for sustaining relationships that are healthy and mutually beneficial.

Falsely accused? Stay calm, because anger makes you look guilty

Anger and silence are the two worst reactions.

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  • A new study conducted various experiments to explore the relationship between anger and judgments of guilt.
  • The results suggest that when an accused person becomes angry, perceivers are more likely to view that person as guilty, even though the accused might be innocent.
  • Paradoxically, the study also found that people who are falsely accused generally become angrier than people who are rightfully accused.
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Research finds narcissists are not just self-absorbed, they're also more likely to be aggressive

Participants with high levels of narcissism showed high levels of aggression, spreading gossip, bullying others, and more.

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We recently reviewed 437 studies of narcissism and aggression involving a total of over 123,000 participants and found narcissism is related to a 21% increase in aggression and an 18% increase in violence.
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Study: Dunbar’s number is wrong. You can have more than 150 friends

Dunbar's number is a popular estimate for the maximum size of social groups. But new research suggests that it's a fictitious number based on flimsy data and bad theory.

  • A team of researchers recalculated Dunbar's number using his original methods and better data.
  • Their estimates were as high as 520 and were stretched over a wide enough range as to be nearly useless.
  • The authors suggest that the method used to calculate the number of friends a person can have is also theoretically unsound.
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