4 relationship problems that can be linked back to early childhood

An inside look at common relationship problems that link to how we were raised.

Photo by OSTILL is Franck Camhi on Shutterstock
  • Fear of abandonment or other attachment issues can stem from childhood loss (the death of a parent) but can also stem from mistreatment or emotional neglect as a child.
  • Longitudinal studies have proven that a child's inability to maintain healthy relationships may be significantly impaired by having an insecure attachment to a primary caregiver during their early development.
  • While these are common relationship problems that may be rooted in childhood experiences, as adults, we can break the cycle.
Keep reading Show less

Japanese scientists discover clue to erasing traumatic memories

Researchers make breakthrough in studying traumatic long-term memory in flies.

Pixabay
  • Scientists in Japan find that light can affect long-term traumatic memories in flies.
  • Keeping male flies in the dark helped them overcome negative mating memories.
  • The researchers hope to use the finding to develop new treatments for PTSD and similar disorders.
Keep reading Show less

The psychology of healing from sexual trauma

A deeper look at what happens in the first 2 years after experiencing sexual trauma.

Photo by Mihai Surdu on Shutterstock

Content Warning:
The content in this article may be triggering to some readers. This article contains discussion around the topics of sexual assault, rape, sexual violence, trauma and PTSD. Please read at your own discretion.


  • Between 17-25% of women and 1-3% of men will report an instance of sexual abuse within their lifetime - however, research suggests up to 80% of sexual violence goes unreported, so the number of people who have experienced sexual abuse is much higher than you think.
  • A 2004 study takes a look at the psychological healing process sexual abuse survivors experience within the first 21 months after their assault.
  • Results of this study prove the decrease in behavioral self-blame that survivors reported feeling within the first 21 months after their attack greatly aided in their recovery.
Keep reading Show less

Does drone warfare reduce harm? Maybe not.

Proponents of drones in foreign conflicts argue that it reduces harm for civilians and U.S. military personnel alike. Here's why that might be wrong.

  • There has been a huge increase in drone usage since the war on terror. Proponents of drone warfare claim it reduces civilian casualties and collateral damage, that it's cheaper than conventional warfare tactics, and that it's safer for U.S. military personnel.
  • The data suggests those claims may be false, says scholar Abigail Blanco. Drones are, at best, about equivalent to conventional technologies, but in some cases may actually be worse.
  • Blanco explains how skewed US government definitions don't give honest data on civilian casualties. Drone operators also suffer worse psychological repercussions following a drone strike because of factors such as the intimacy of prolonged surveillance and heat-sensing technology which lets the operator observe the heat leaving a dying body to confirm a kill.
Keep reading Show less

One of the best ways to treat anxiety? A full night's rest, new research suggests.

Researchers discover that not only can anxiety prevent you from sleeping, but not getting a good night's sleep might also cause anxiety.

Photo credit: Megan te Boekhorst on Unsplash
  • Anxiety disorders are frequently associated with poor sleep. The intuitive conclusion is that anxious individuals are too worried to fall asleep.
  • However, a recent fMRI study revealed that failing to get a good night's sleep, even for healthy individuals, can also contribute to anxiety levels the next day, raising them by up to 30 percent.
  • The findings suggest that one of the best ways to treat anxiety may be to get in a full night's rest.
Keep reading Show less