The power of Moore’s law: Predicting the future

The power to predict the next revolution keeps companies on top.

  • In 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore observed that the number of transistors placed in an integrated circuit doubles approximately every two years, meaning computing power doubles while the size of devices shrink. This is known as Moore's law.
  • IBM was king of the heap in the 1950s, says physicist Michio Kaku, however it failed to read Moore's law as a sign that supercomputers would be replaced by smart phones — handheld devices that contain more computing power than NASA at the time of the Moon landing.
  • Microsoft rose up in IBM's ashes by predicting the age of personal computing, but they too failed to account for an exponential change: the internet. The next revolution is 5G and AI, and companies who are setting themselves up for that future will be the ones who rise to the top.
Keep reading Show less

Could ‘Planet 9’ actually be an ancient black hole?

A new paper suggests a primordial black hole may be making things weird at the edge of our solar system.

Image source: Vadim Sadovski /IgorZh/Shutterstock/Big Think
  • Though a Planet 9 has been hypothesized, we can't seem to find it, at least not yet.
  • The strange orbits of distant bodies and weird gravitational anomalies beg for an explanation.
  • Scientists propose a hunt for telltale gamma rays from a primordial black hole.
Keep reading Show less

The writing on the wall: The coming collapse of the industrial livestock industry

A new report sees a major disruption in where we get our food.

Image source: Celiafoto / Shutterstock
  • We're just a few years from the tipping point in engineered food.
  • Traditional agriculture's 10,000-year-run is about over.
  • Better foods, tastier foods, and cheaper foods are on the way.
Keep reading Show less

How your immortal consciousness will travel the universe

Someday we'll beam to the moon for afternoon tea, and be back in New York for dinner.

  • In about 100 years, theoretical physicist Michio Kaku believes we'll explore the universe as pure consciousness — traveling at the speed of light, looking at asteroids, comets, meteors, and eventually the stars. "All of this within the laws of physics," he says.
  • Through recent brain imaging, we know know that the prefrontal cortex of teenagers is fully formed. This induces them to take risks. Also, when guys who talk with pretty girls, we also know it's that blood drains from their brains. Well, their prefrontal cortex. This makes them liable to act "mentally retarded."
  • The Connectome Project will map the entire brain in about 100 years.
Keep reading Show less

Michio Kaku: Mental communication and infinite knowledge are on the horizon

Soon we'll be able to blink and instantly go online via computer chips attached to our eyes.

  • Eventually computer chips, theoretical physicist Michio Kaku avers, will cost a penny, which is the cost of scrap paper. They'll be so pervasive, they'll even be attached to your eyeball.
  • They'll be in your contact lens, allowing you to blink and go online — you'll have access to the internet and will be able to access the knowledge stored on the internet.
  • In the future, Kaku says, we'll be able to convey emotions and memories to one another another via "brain net." This will render emojis and current forms of entertainment, such as sound-and-screen movies, obsolete.
Keep reading Show less