Active ingredient in Roundup found in 95% of studied beers and wines

The controversial herbicide is everywhere, apparently.

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  • U.S. PIRG tested 20 beers and wines, including organics, and found Roundup's active ingredient in almost all of them.
  • A jury on August 2018 awarded a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma victim $289 million in Roundup damages.
  • Bayer/Monsanto says Roundup is totally safe. Others disagree.
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High pollution linked to unhappiness among Chinese people, MIT researchers say

Who would've thought that never seeing blue sky would bum you out?

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  • China's economy is growing at 8 percent per year, but its citizens aren't getting any happier.
  • New research from MIT analyzed 33 million posts from Sina Weibo (the Chinese version of Twitter) and compared their expressed happiness with local pollution levels.
  • The study shows that high-pollution days are making Chinese civilians significantly less happy.
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A map of London's most toxic breathing spots

Air pollution is up to five times over the EU limit in these Central London hotspots.

  • Dirty air is an invisible killer, but an effective one.
  • More than 9,000 people die prematurely in London each year due to air pollution, a recent study estimates.
  • This map visualizes the worst places to breathe in Central London.
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At least 340,000 Americans died from radioactive fallout between 1951 and 1973

Domestic nuclear testing wreaked havoc on thousands of families.

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  • Hiroshima and Nagasaki resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands. But new research shows that domestic U.S. nuclear tests likely killed more.
  • The new research tracked an unlikely vector for radioactive transmission: dairy cows.
  • The study serves as a reminder of the insidious and deadly nature of nuclear weapons.
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Eat a 'flexitarian' diet to help stop climate change

Whether or not there are tropical islands in 50 years might depend on whether or not we can eat fewer hamburgers.

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  • Results from recent research suggest we have roughly 12 years to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. If we can't, then the amount of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere will have compounding feedback loops that progressively warm the planet up further.
  • One of the biggest culprits in warming the planet is the production of beef and sheep meat.
  • Anybody could help prevent climate change by consuming less beef and sheep, or by cutting them out entirely.
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