Scientists invent method to extract gold from liquid waste

The next gold rush might take place in our sewers.

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  • Even though we think of it as exceedingly rare, gold can be found all around us.
  • The trouble is, most of the gold is hard to get at; its too diluted in our waste or ocean waters to effectively extract.
  • This new technique quickly, easily, and reliably extracts gold from most liquids.
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Report: Just 23% of Earth's wilderness remains

A new paper in Nature adds urgency to the fight against climate change.

Photo: Pixabay
  • "77% of land (excluding Antarctica) and 87% of the ocean has been modified by the direct effects of human activities," states a new paper in Nature.
  • Just 5 countries—Russia, Canada, Australia, the U.S., and Brazil—contain 70% of the world's wilderness (excluding Antarctica).
  • The paper emphasizes the urgent need to protect large-scale ecosystems, calling them a buffer against the Anthropocene.
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Google and NatGeo team up to combat climate change

They're creating an unprecedented map of Earth to help government leaders make better decisions in regard to climate change.

(National Geographic/Google/Big Think)
  • A recently proposed campaign among scientists aims to protect 30 percent of Earth's land and oceans by 2030.
  • In light of this, National Geographic and Google announce an unprecedented mapping project to help government leaders make better decisions in regard to climate change, and to meet the 2030 targets.
  • The Wyss Campaign for Nature Foundation is pledging $1 billion to help meet the 2030 targets.
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Photo Ark: See dazzling images of the Earth’s animals

Maybe the only chance they have to tell their story before they're gone.

  • The Photo Ark by photographer Joel Sartore and National Geographic brings the viewer face to face with our planet's fellow travelers.
  • It's predicted that half of earth's species may be lost before 2100.
  • This collection of images is beautiful and profound.
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100% of people in pilot study had microplastic in their stools

The study was small: 8 people from 8 different countries. But the findings have alarmed scientists.

(Jessica Donohue/Sea Education Association)
  • All subjects selected for a pilot program had microplastics in their stools.
  • The types of microplastics found implicate both food and non-food sources.
  • Boutique water may be healthier, but its bottles not so much.
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