Men who receive paternity leave want fewer children

A new study in Spain displays the powerful effects of empathy.

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  • Men that take paid paternity leave in Spain are less likely to want more children in the future.
  • The study's authors believe that men become more aware of the overall costs of raising children.
  • Before the service was enacted, women spent 4.2 hours engaged in unpaid childcare labor compared to 1.3 hours by men.
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Culture & Religion

Reading to infants benefits both baby and adult, new research finds

A study at Rutgers University details the importance of this parent-child bond.

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  • Infants aged 1-3 are less likely to be disruptive or hyperactive when they're read to regularly.
  • Parents that read to their toddlers are less likely to exhibit harsh behavior toward their children.
  • Regular reading provides not only "academic but emotional benefits that can help bolster the child's success in school and beyond."
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Mind & Brain

Not having children is another choice we should be discussing

In her new documentary, Maxine Trump tackles the topic of choosing not to procreate.

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  • Maxine Trump's forthcoming documentary, To Kid Or Not To Kid, investigates why women choose not to have children.
  • Twenty percent of women are making this choice, Trump says, which is not a small minority.
  • Climate change and an inability to find a suitable partner are top reasons for this decision.
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Culture & Religion

Mother bonobos, too, pressure their sons to have grandchildren

If you thought your mother was pushy in her pursuit of grandchildren, wait until you learn about bonobo mothers.

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  • Mother bonobos have been observed to help their sons find and copulate with mates.
  • The mothers accomplish this by leading sons to mates, interfering with other males trying to copulate with females, and helping sons rise in the social hierarchy of the group.
  • Why do mother bonobos do this? The "grandmother hypothesis" might hold part of the answer.
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Surprising Science
Pixabay
  • A report from the National Center for Health Statistics shows that 2018 saw the fewest babies born in the U.S. since 1986.
  • The reasons are plenty: After effects from the Great Recession, fewer teenage pregnancies, prohibitive child care costs, concerns over climate change and political strife, and different priorities among millennials.
  • The low birthrate isn't necessarily cause for alarm, however if it keeps declining it may be difficult for future generations to support an aging population.
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Politics & Current Affairs