The more we see fake news, the more likely we are to share it

Research has found that previously encountered information feels more "fluent."

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Over the last few years, so-called "fake news" — purposefully untrue misinformation spread online — has become more and more of a concern.

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Is globalization actually disempowering?

More than ever before, we're aware of the tragedy and suffering that goes on in the world. But does that mean we can do more about it?

  • All animals operate on empirical senses to survive. With technology, humans have so increased our sensorial capacity that we maintain a high stress level without necessarily being in danger.
  • Globalization creates a sense of unity in that we are aware of what's going on in the world without being empowered to do something about the tragedy that occurs.
  • By narrowing that focus, we can actually have an impact.
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Boeing to halt production of the 737 as FAA continues review

Following two deadly crashes, the FAA has been engaged in a lengthy review process of the Boeing 737. With recent news that the review may continue into 2020, Boeing has opted to halt production of the plane.

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  • Boeing has decided to halt the production of the 737 Max after the FAA announced that its review of the plane will extend into 2020.
  • After two recent and deadly crashes, the FAA has grounded all 737-model planes.
  • The news spells financial trouble for Boeing, especially since another one of its major planes — the 787 Dreamliner — has been receiving significant quality complaints.
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Why the singular “They” is Merriam-Webster's word of the year

"They" has taken on a not-so-new meaning lately. This earned it the scrutiny it needed to win.

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  • Merriam-Webster has announced "they" as the word of the year.
  • The selection was based on a marked increase in traffic to the online dictionary page.
  • Runners up included "quid pro quo" and "crawdad."
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Greta Thunberg, climate change activist, wins Time Person of the Year

Going from a solitary teenage protester in front of the Swedish parliament to a global icon in little more than a year certainly merits a distinction.

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  • Greta Thunberg, the 16-year-old Swedish climate change activist, has been named Time's Person of the Year.
  • The award is given to "the person or persons who most affected the news and our lives, for good or ill, and embodied what was important about the year, for better or for worse."
  • Considering the magnitude of directly inspired protest movements and real-world impacts she has had, the award seems to be merited, although not everybody is pleased about this.
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