Researchers: Voting machines can be easily hacked

As it turns out, hacking an election isn't as hard as you'd think.

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  • A group of hackers has demonstrated that many common voting machines are easily compromised.
  • The group presented their findings to Congress, where election security is increasingly a serious concern.
  • The question of how secure voting machines are isn't new, but the current political climate gives it new meaning.
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Two philosophers' views on California's homelessness epidemic

How can Innovation Central not manage to solve its own sprawling homelessness?

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  • The housing crisis in California has reached new heights, with more than 100,000 people without homes.
  • To some, the dichotomy between the innovation the state is known for and its denizens ongoing inability to solve the problem is boggling.
  • A couple of famous philosophers can show us how this problem isn't actually as odd as it seems.
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Too many people think satirical news is real

Americans' inability to agree on what is true and what is false is a problem for democracy.

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In July, the website Snopes published a piece fact-checking a story posted on The Babylon Bee, a popular satirical news site with a conservative bent.

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YouTube fined $170 million for harvesting data from children

But some say the settlement is a slap on the wrist.

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  • The Federal Trade Commission and New York's attorney general reached an agreement with Google in which YouTube must pay a fine and bolster protections for children's privacy on its platform.
  • Now, YouTube creators who created child-directed content will have to designate videos as such, and personalized ads will no longer be allowed on such content.
  • YouTube said these changes will take place in about four months.
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Climate deniers get more airtime than experts

There's fairness, and then there's craziness.

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  • There's no dispute that climate change is real and we're causing it.
  • Climate coverage coverage gives non-expert outsized influence.
  • Non-scientists with mere opinions get as much or more exposure as experts.
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