It's easier to read mens' faces — here's how you can determine if he's cheated

1,500 study participants play Spot the Cheater

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  • Male philanderers faces give them away slightly more often than female faces do.
  • Study tests idea of being able to spot competition as an evolutionary aid to protecting our relationships.
  • The most reliable — though not very reliable — cue is sexual dimorphism.
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Sex & Relationships

Believe in soulmates? You're more likely to 'ghost' romantic partners.

Does believing in true love make people act like jerks?

Thought Catalog via Unsplash
  • Ghosting, or cutting off all contact suddenly with a romantic partner, is not nice.
  • Growth-oriented people (who think relationships are made, not born) do not appreciate it.
  • Destiny-oriented people (who believe in soulmates) are more likely to be okay with ghosting.
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Sex & Relationships

Your romantic partner is probably less intelligent than you think, suggests new study

Our egotism and self-confidence can sometimes spill-over to our loved ones.

It's now well known that many of us over-estimate our own brainpower. In one study, more than 90 per cent of US college professors famously claimed to be better than average at teaching, for instance – which would be highly unlikely. Our egos blind us to our own flaws.

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Mind & Brain

6 signs you’re in an emotionally strong relationship

These powerful habits from six powerful people are worth taking to heart.

One of the most important yet underappreciated parts of a happy, fulfilling relationship is emotional strength — but what does that really mean? Research shows that emotional strength primarily comes down to maintaining a healthy perspective, a trait that's ever more important within the context of romantic relationships, where opportunities for miscommunication and unhealthy habits can be plentiful.

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Sex & Relationships

Why doesn't the heart shape look like an actual heart?

The answer can be found several thousand years ago, in the Roman city of Cyrene.

Photo credit: Olivier Collet on Unsplash
  • If our real hearts looked anything like the symbol that represents them, we'd all probably have a much harder time pumping blood through our bodies.
  • The reason why the heart symbol looks nothing like the anatomical heart has its roots, oddly enough, in the economy of a Roman city called Cyrene.
  • Cyrene's heart symbol became associated with love through a strange confluence of botany, philosophy, and sex.
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Sex & Relationships