Lab-grown brain organoids mature like real infant brains

After 20 months, scientists find lab-dish brain cells matured at a similar rate to those of an actual infant.

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  • Scientists have found that cultures of embryonic brain cells mature at the same rate as a 20-month-old infant's.
  • Researchers have looked to such cell structures, called "organoids," as potential models for understanding the human body's biological mechanisms.
  • Their study validates the use of lab-dish organoids for research.
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Record for oldest DNA ever sequenced broken by mammoth remains

One million year old mammoth DNA more than doubles the previous record and suggests that even older genomes could be found.

  • Scientists extracting DNA from mammoth teeth have set a new record for the oldest DNA ever sequenced.
  • The new record holder may also be a member of a new species of mammoth, but that remains to be proven.
  • The findings suggest that DNA as old as 2.6 million years old could be decoded.
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Selfish sperm genes 'poison' the competition for the win

Imagine poisoning your rival and yourself and giving only yourself the antidote.

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  • The t-haplotype alleles play dirty when it comes to reaching the egg first.
  • In order for their nefarious scene to work, just the right amount of a certain protein has to be present.
  • Experiments with mouse sperm reveal the whole complicated story.
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Study: Language (not geography) major force behind India’s gene flow

The study found that people who spoke the same language tended to be more closely related despite living far apart.

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  • Studies focusing on European genetics have found a strong correlation between geography and genetic variation.
  • Looking toward India, a new study found a stronger correlation between gene variation and language as well as
  • social structure.
  • Understanding social and cultural influences can help expand our knowledge of gene flow through human history.
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10 things you may not know about anxiety

Cold hands and feet? Maybe it's your anxiety.

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  • When we feel anxious, the brain's fight or flight instinct kicks in, and the blood flow is redirected from your extremities towards the torso and vital organs.
  • According to the CDC, 7.1% of children between the ages of 3-17 (approximately 4.4 million) have an anxiety diagnosis.
  • Anxiety disorders will impact 31% of Americans at some point in their lives.
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