Study links 'sun-seeking behavior' to genes involved in addiction

A large-scale study from King's College London explores the link between genetics and sun-seeking behaviors.

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  • There are a number of physical and mental health benefits to sun exposure, such as boosted vitamin D and serotonin levels and stronger bones.
  • Addictions are multi-step conditions that, by definition, require exposure to the addictive agent and have also been proven to have a genetic factor. Countless people are exposed to addictive things, but not all become addicted. This is because of the genetic component of addiction.
  • This large-scale study explores the link between sun-seeking behaviors and the genetic markers for addiction.
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Chadwick Boseman's death is tragic. Here's what you need to know about colon cancer.

Despite Boseman's young age, this cancer is increasingly common in people under 50.

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  • Though Chadwick Boseman was only 43, rates of cancer in people under 50 have been increasing since 2006.
  • African-Americans are 20 percent more likely to get this cancer and 40 percent more likely to die from it than other racial groups.
  • Preventive measure include better diet, exercise, regular screenings, and a reduction in smoking and drinking.
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Study: Autistic brains develop differently before birth

New research shows that neurons in autistic brains begin to developmentally diverge in early prenatal stages.

  • Autism is known to emerge during prenatal development, but it can't be diagnosed until a child is at least 12 months old.
  • A new study observed the differences between autistic and control nerve cells as they grew in vitro.
  • Researchers found that developmental divergence in autistic neurons occurs early in prenatal neurodevelopment.
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Study identifies animal species that may be susceptible to coronavirus

On the list of animals at risk are several endangered species.

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  • SARS-CoV-2 enters our cells by binding with ACE2 receptors.
  • A study finds many animals may provide a similar point of entry for the infection.
  • COVID-19 has already been seen in a range of non-humans.

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By folding DNA into a virus-like structure, MIT researchers have designed HIV-like particles that provoke a strong immune response from human immune cells grown in a lab dish. Such particles might eventually be used as an HIV vaccine.

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