Beyond Meat: Are you ready for lab-grown salmon?

An overfished planet needs a better solution. Fortunately, it's coming.

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  • Cell-based fish companies are getting funding and making progress in offering a new wave of seafood.
  • Overfishing and rising ocean temperatures are destroying entire ecosystems.
  • The reality of cell-based fish is likely five to 10 years away.
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Sharks flee in terror when killer whales show up

Sharks fear killer whales. How does this impact the ecosystems they share?

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  • A new study finds that sharks will flee areas they met orcas in for up to a year.
  • Killer whales are known to eat sharks, but it is unknown if the sharks are fleeing because they know that too.
  • The discovery will change our understanding of how marine ecosystems evolve.
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Scientists find 16 'ultra-black' fish species that absorb 99.9% of light

These alien-like creatures are virtually invisible in the deep sea.

Credit: Karen Osborn/Smithsonian
  • A team of marine biologists used nets to catch 16 species of deep-sea fish that have evolved the ability to be virtually invisible to prey and predators.
  • "Ultra-black" skin seems to be an evolutionary adaptation that helps fish camouflage themselves in the deep sea, which is illuminated by bioluminescent organisms.
  • There are likely more, and potentially much darker, ultra-black fish lurking deep in the ocean.
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Giant whale sharks have teeth on their eyeballs

The ocean's largest shark relies on vision more than previously believed.

Photo by Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images
  • Japanese researchers discovered that the whale shark has "tiny teeth"—dermal denticles—protecting its eyes from abrasion.
  • They also found the shark is able to retract its eyeball into the eye socket.
  • Their research confirms that this giant fish relies on vision more than previously believed.
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The great white shark has surprising dining habits

Scientists are befuddled by where the shark gets most of its food.

Photo by Gerald Schömbs / Unsplash
  • A University of Sydney research team found that the great white shark spends an unexpectedly large amount of time feeding close to the sea bed.
  • The group examined the contents in the stomachs of 40 juvenile white sharks and found the remains of a variety of fish species that typically inhabit the sea floor or are buried in the sand.
  • The scientists hope that the information gained from this research will assist conservation and management efforts for the species.
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