Can consumer brands survive boycotting Facebook?

Bigger brands can afford to take their ad budgets elsewhere – less so with direct-to-consumer brands.

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  • Over 500 companies, well-known consumer brands among them, have announced that they will not advertise on Facebook-owned media properties until the company curbs hate speech on its platform.
  • Facebook is likely to sustain minimal damages at the hands of the #StopHateForProfit movement, because the lion's share of potential participants depend on the platform for business, and it isn't mutual.
  • Even if all 100 of Facebook's top ad buyers were to suddenly freeze their campaigns and participate in the boycott, that would still only represent 6% of the platform's income.
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Facebook finally adds option to delete old posts in batches

Got any embarrassing old posts collecting dust on your profile? Facebook wants to help you delete them.

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  • The feature is called Manage Activity, and it's currently available through mobile and Facebook Lite.
  • Manage Activity lets users sort old content by filters like date and posts involving specific people.
  • Some companies now use AI-powered background checking services that scrape social media profiles for problematic content.
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Facebook moving forward with hiding like counts to fight envy

This could become a standard feature one day.

Photo credit: Boudewijn Huysmans on Unsplash
  • Facebook has begun hiding 'like counts' in Australia.
  • Earlier this month, a reverse engineer predicted that this would be the case.
  • The new feature may help in reducing envy and other ill-fated social effects.
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I invested in Facebook. By 2016, I couldn’t stay silent.

Why an early Facebook investor is now Facebook's biggest critic.

  • Investor Roger McNamee joined Facebook as an early investor when the company was just two years old.
  • In this video, he explains why he went from Facebook supporter to public critic, and why he came to write the book "Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe".
  • The next billion dollars Facebook makes means nothing if it doesn't reform its practices, says McNamee.
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Slactivism: The problem with moral outrage on the internet

Why virtue signaling does nothing.

"A big problem with moral outrage on the Internet is that it leads people to think they’ve done something when in fact they haven’t done something," says author Alice Dreger. Sure, you might get a little rush out of updating your status to say something, but all you're really doing is virtue signaling. Alice's latest book is Galileo's Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and One Scholar's Search for Justice.

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