New wellness center lets guests cuddle with cows

Cow cuddling is getting ever more popular, but what's the science behind using animals for relaxation?

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  • An Indian non-profit hopes to help people relax by giving them cuddle sessions with cows.
  • This is not the first such center where you can chill out with cattle.
  • Like other emotional support animals, the proven health benefits are limited.
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How tiny bioelectronic implants may someday replace pharmaceutical drugs

Scientists are using bioelectronic medicine to treat inflammatory diseases, an approach that capitalizes on the ancient "hardwiring" of the nervous system.

Credit: Adobe Stock / SetPoint Medical

Left: The vagus nerve, the body's longest cranial nerve. Right: Vagus nerve stimulation implant by SetPoint Medical.

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • Bioelectronic medicine is an emerging field that focuses on manipulating the nervous system to treat diseases.
  • Clinical studies show that using electronic devices to stimulate the vagus nerve is effective at treating inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Although it's not yet approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, vagus nerve stimulation may also prove effective at treating other diseases like cancer, diabetes and depression.
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Could playing video games be linked to lower depression rates in kids?

Can playing video games really curb the risk of depression? Experts weigh in.

Previous studies have concluded there are some mental health benefits to playing video games.

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  • A new study published by a UCL researcher has demonstrated how different types of screen time can positively (or negatively) influence young people's mental health.
  • Young boys who played video games daily had lower depression scores at age 14 compared to those who played less than once per month or never.
  • The study also noted that more frequent video game use was consistently associated with fewer depressive symptoms in boys with lower physical activity, but not in those with high physical activity levels.
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JULIO CESAR AGUILAR/AFP via Getty Images
The majority of Americans are stressed, sleep-deprived and overweight and suffer from largely preventable lifestyle diseases such as heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes.
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4 tips for college students to avoid procrastinating with their online work

More than 70% of college students procrastinate

Photo by Callum T on Unsplash
Personal Growth

If you take classes online, chances are you probably procrastinate from time to time.

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How leaders influence people to believe

Being a leader is about more than the job title. You have to earn respect.

Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • What does it take to be a leader? For Northwell Health president and CEO Michael Dowling, having an Ivy League degree and a large office is not what makes a leader. Leadership requires something much less tangible: influence.
  • True leaders inspire people to follow and believe in them and the organization's mission by being passionate, having humility, and being a real part of the team. This is especially important in a field like health care, where guidance and teamwork save lives.
  • Authenticity is also key. "Don't pretend, be real," says Dowling. "Accept your vulnerabilities, accept your weaknesses, know where your strengths are, and get people to belong."
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7 dimensions of depression, explained

From baboon hierarchies to the mind-gut connection, the path to defeating depression starts with understanding its causes.

Videos
  • According to the World Health Organization, more than 264 million people suffer from depression. It is the leading cause of disability and, at its worst, can lead to suicide. Unfortunately, depression is often misunderstood or ignored until it is too late.
  • Psychologist Daniel Goleman, comedian Pete Holmes, neuroscientist Emeran Mayer, psychiatrist Drew Ramsey, and more outline several of the social, chemical, and neurological factors that may contribute to the complex disorder and explain why there is not a singular solution or universal "cure" that can alleviate the symptoms.
  • From gaining insight into how the brain-gut connection works and adopting a more Mediterranean diet, to seeking help from medical or spiritual practitioners, depression is a personal battle that requires a personalized strategy to keep it at bay, as well as more research and understanding.
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