Expert tips for avoiding the 'time famine' trap

How to manage your time so you can actually accomplish what you want to.

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  • In a world that's always online, it's easy to feel like we have insufficient time for ourselves, or to spend with our families and loved ones.
  • Working out what you need to get done each day, and how long it will take, will allow you to create priorities on which you can focus your available time.
  • If you find the traditional methods of mindfulness meditation too difficult, then meditative practices such as yoga or even running can also be extremely beneficial.
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Photos: Courtesy of Let Grow

Yug, age 7, and Alia, age 10, both entered Let Grow's "Independence Challenge" essay contest.

Sponsored by Charles Koch Foundation
  • The coronavirus pandemic may have a silver lining: It shows how insanely resourceful kids really are.
  • Let Grow, a non-profit promoting independence as a critical part of childhood, ran an "Independence Challenge" essay contest for kids. Here are a few of the amazing essays that came in.
  • Download Let Grow's free Independence Kit with ideas for kids.
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Over 400 Ivy League courses are free online right now

With the coronavirus pandemic upending summer plans, now's the perfect time to learn something new.

  • Although states are reopening, coronavirus has already canceled many summer plans.
  • Ivy League universities and other course providers are offering online courses for free.
  • Free online courses cover a range of academic and personal-growth topics.
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    Why we must teach students to solve big problems

    The future of education and work will rely on teaching students deeper problem-solving skills.

    • Asking kids 'What do you want to be when you grow up?' is a question that used to make sense, says Jaime Casap. But it not longer does; the nature of automation and artificial intelligence means future jobs are likely to shift and reform many times over.
    • Instead, educators should foster a culture of problem solving. Ask children: What problem do you want to solve? And what talents or passions do you have that can be the avenues by which you solve it?
    • "[T]he future of education starts on Monday and then Tuesday and then Wednesday and it's constant and consistent and it's always growing, always improving, and if we create that culture I think that would bring us a long way," Casap says.
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    How to finally bring your side hustle idea to life

    Start building momentum by breaking your new side business idea down into manageable baby steps.

    @olly on Pexels
    Coronavirus
    • About one-third of Americans take on a side hustle purely for the extra spending money.
    • Just because you're no longer commuting to work doesn't mean it's easy to dive in to a new business initiative.
    • Breaking it all down into bite-sized chunks may make launching your new side gig feel less overwhelming.
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    Sooner or later we all face death. Will a sense of meaning help us?

    As a doctor, I am reminded every day of the fragility of the human body, how closely mortality lurks just around the corner.

    Photo by Alex Boyd on Unsplash
    Personal Growth

    'Despite all our medical advances,' my friend Jason used to quip, 'the mortality rate has remained constant – one per person.'

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    Six-month-olds recognize (and like) when they’re being imitated

    A new study may help us better understand how children build social cognition through caregiver interaction.

    Personal Growth
  • Scientists speculate imitation helps develop social cognition in babies.
  • A new study out of Lund University shows that six-month-olds look and smile more at imitating adults.
  • Researchers hope the data will spur future studies to discover what role caregiver imitation plays in social cognition development.
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