Making memories actually involves breaking our DNA, study shows

Brain cells snap strands of DNA in many more places and cell types than researchers previously thought.

The urgency to remember a dangerous experience requires the brain to make a series of potentially dangerous moves: Neurons and other brain cells snap open their DNA in numerous locations — more than previously realized, according to a new study — to provide quick access to genetic instructions for the mechanisms of memory storage.

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The pursuit for a high quality genome begins with this rare bird

The Vertebrate Genomes Project may spell good news for the kakapo and the vaquita.

The flightless kakapo of New Zealand is in trouble.
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Mixing human + animal DNA and the future of gene editing

"The question is which are okay, which are not okay."

  • As the material that makes all living things what/who we are, DNA is the key to understanding and changing the world. British geneticist Bryan Sykes and Francis Collins (director of the Human Genome Project) explain how, through gene editing, scientists can better treat illnesses, eradicate diseases, and revolutionize personalized medicine.
  • But existing and developing gene editing technologies are not without controversies. A major point of debate deals with the idea that gene editing is overstepping natural and ethical boundaries. Just because they can, does that mean that scientists should be edit DNA?
  • Harvard professor Glenn Cohen introduces another subcategory of gene experiments: mixing human and animal DNA. "The question is which are okay, which are not okay, why can we generate some principles," Cohen says of human-animal chimeras and arguments concerning improving human life versus morality.

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Crack the code of your dog's DNA with this affordable genetic testing kit

Find your dog's breed mix, personality and more with a simple cheek swab in this DNA kit.

  • There’s a great deal of information about our canine companions we don’t know.
  • An easy solution exists that allows for quick and painless genetic testing of dogs.
  • For a low price, you can learn crucial information, such as predisposition to certain diseases.
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Your genetics influence how resilient you are to the cold

What makes some people more likely to shiver than others?

KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP via Getty Images

Some people just aren't bothered by the cold, no matter how low the temperature dips. And the reason for this may be in a person's genes.

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