The debate is over: Cats care, study shows

A study at the University of Oregon puts a longstanding myth to rest.

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  • Cats form attachments to their caregivers at the same rate as humans and dogs, a new study shows.
  • Seventy kittens were tested in the initial study, followed by another with 38 cats over one year of age.
  • Cats speak a different language than dogs, which likely caused confusion as to their nature.
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Cat ladies aren't 'depressed, anxious or alone,' say UCLA researchers

Cat owners are no more likely to be crazy than you.

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  • A study at UCLA found that cat and dog owners are just as likely to be crazy as non-pet owners.
  • Misunderstanding cats often results from expecting them to act like dogs.
  • Learning the natural behavior of your pet is essential for developing a strong bond with them.
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Mathematician Eric Weinstein launches a new podcast, 'The Portal'

The Portal promises to be a deep dive into the possible.

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  • Mathematician Eric Weinstein wants to put the mystery back into the world with his new podcast, The Portal.
  • The managing director of Thiel Capital announced his new project last week on the Joe Rogan Experience.
  • Weinstein says the recurring narrative is important during childhood, yet we often lose touch with it in adulthood.
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Want to have better sex? Talk about 'it' with your partner more, say Texas researchers

Conversation helps sexual satisfaction and desire, especially with partners in committed relationships.

  • A new meta-analysis from the University of Texas at Austin finds that better sexual communication leads to better sex.
  • The survey of 48 studies discovered that communication plays a key role in helping with a number of sexual dysfunctions.
  • Both genders benefit in regard to orgasms and satisfaction, while desire is an important component of female sexuality.
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The most desired people in the job market? 'Glue people.'

Here's why "glue people" won't get steamrolled by job automation.

  • In researching his new book How to Win in a Winner-Take-All World, economics journalist Neil Irwin discovered that what makes people succeed in a highly competitive job market is what he calls being a "glue person."
  • Glue people are people who pull teams together to make them greater than the sum of their parts. They are typically specialists in one area but can also understand other specializations and communicate across boundaries.
  • The most natural thing to do is to find one thing you're good at and stick with it. Glue people do the opposite – they stretch themselves.
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