Just how big is India's 'Mount Everest of Trash'?

The Ghazipur dump keeps growing and growing every year, catching fire and leaching toxins into the ground. What can be done about it?

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  • The Ghazipur dump in Delhi has become so overgrown that locals refer to it as "Mount Everest."
  • In 2017, a landslide from the dump spilled over onto adjacent roads, killing two locals.
  • The dump is a serious health risk and source of pollution, but it also serves as an example of India's broader challenges with waste management.
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Politics & Current Affairs

Fruit juice is not healthy. Taxing it will slash American obesity.

100 percent fruit juice is still 100 percent sugar.

Photo by: Houin/BSIP/UIG via Getty Images
  • Research at the University of Waterloo claims that taxing fruit juice results in healthier purchasing habits.
  • Participants that were taxed "produced greater reductions in sugars and calories than those that did not."
  • Experts say that stripping fruit of its fiber for juice is a dubious nutritional practice.
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Surprising Science

Why the founder of Mother's Day hated what it had become

Buying cards and flowers on Mother's Day would make Anna Jarvis roll around in her grave.

Photo credit: Agnieszka Kowalczyk on Unsplash
  • When Woodrow Wilson declared Mother's Day a national holiday, Anna Jarvis — who had long campaigned for such a holiday — was initially delighted.
  • However, Jarvis quickly became horrified by the mass commercialization of the holiday, seeing it as a perversion of the personal and intimate idea behind Mother's Day.
  • This Mother's Day, rather than relying on pre-printed words from a greeting card, consider a handwritten letter or, better yet, a personal visit instead.
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Culture & Religion

Joyless economies: Slavery, feudalism, and unregulated capitalism

Modern capitalism is a "very silly" way of organizing life, says Yanis Varoufakis.

  • Wealth inequality in modern capitalism creates a joyless economy for both the rich and the poor, says Yanis Varoufakis.
  • Wealth inequality in a time of economic abundance makes society less civilized. More evenly distributed resources allow humans to create the literature, art and intellectual works that make human life richer.
  • The universalized depression and stress caused by inequality is "incongruent with our fantastic advances at the technological level," says Varoufakis. "It's a very silly way of organizing life."
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Videos

The secondary ticketing market is worth $15 billion. How long will fans have to pay?

Artists and fans are the big losers as bot-powered scalpers make a killing.

Bruce Springsteen performs on stage at The New York Comedy Festival and The Bob Woodruff Foundation present the 12th Annual Stand Up For Heroes event at The Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden on November 5, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Brian Ach/Getty Images for Bob Woodruff Foundation)
  • The secondary ticketing market is predicted to grow to $15.19 billion next year.
  • Artists, athletes, management, and venues see none of this revenue—it all goes to scalpers and ticketing agencies.
  • Some companies are likely in breach of anti-trust laws, but no one seems to be regulating the industry.
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Politics & Current Affairs