How showing remorse can save your relationships

Scientists ripped up kids' drawings. This is what they learned about relationships.

  • Forgiveness as a cultural act linked to religion and philosophy dates back centuries, but studies focused on the science of apologies, morality, and relationships are fairly new. As Amrisha Vaish explains, causing harm, showing remorse, and feeling concern for others are things children pay attention to, even in their first year of life.
  • In a series of experiments, adults ripped children's artworks and either showed remorse or showed neutrality. They found that remorse really mattered. "Here we see what [the kids] really care about is that the transgressor shows their commitment to them, to the relationship," Vaish says. "And they will seek that person out over even an in-group member."
  • As a highly social species, cooperation is vital to humans. Learning what factors make or break those social bonds can help communities, teams, and partners work together to meet challenges and survive.

Help your kid grow their STEM skills with this hands-on kit

Looking for fun STEM activities to try at home with your kids? Check out this DIY kit packed with 50 projects.

  • Encouraging an early interest in STEM can build a strong foundation for your child's math and science skills in the future.
  • The best way to teach them is with hands-on projects that are enjoyable to them.
  • Help your kid grow their skills with over 50 hands-on projects in this all-in-one STEM electronics kit.
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Yes, more and more young adults are living with their parents – but is that necessarily bad?

Having grown kids still at home is not likely to do you, or them, any permanent harm.

Photo by Parker Gibbons on Unsplash

When the Pew Research Center recently reported that the proportion of 18-to-29-year-old Americans who live with their parents has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, perhaps you saw some of the breathless headlines hyping how it's higher than at any time since the Great Depression.

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Remote education is decreasing anxiety, increasing wellbeing for some students

A recent NIHR report found that students with previously low connectedness scores saw improvement in well-being and eased anxiety.

  • With coronavirus resurging in Europe and the United States, parents are worried about their children's well-being and mental health.
  • A report from the U.K.'s NIHR extends some hope; it found that students' mental health is improving while remote learning.
  • Parents will continue play an important role in supporting their children's mental health.
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Just 1 month in greener play areas could boost kids’ immune systems, study says

The researchers say their findings support the idea that low biodiversity in modern living environments could lead to "uneducated" immune systems.

Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Making outdoor play areas greener and more biodiverse could improve children's immune systems in one month, a new study suggests.

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