There’s nowhere left on Earth free of space pollution

When we look at the night sky, we may see junk instead of stars.

Credit: Petrovich12 / Adobe Stock
  • New research has found that the entire planet is covered by light pollution from space objects.
  • Companies like SpaceX and Amazon plan to launch thousands of satellites into orbit this decade.
  • Scientists fear this space traffic will impede their ability to stare into deep space.
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  • A major hurdle for any human mission to Mars is how to feed astronauts during the extended spaceflight.
  • NASA is currently crowdsourcing solutions through its Deep Space Food Challenge.
  • The challenge is open to all U.S. citizens and ends July 30, 2021.
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    What early US presidents looked like, according to AI-generated images

    "Deepfakes" and "cheap fakes" are becoming strikingly convincing — even ones generated on freely available apps.

    Magdalene Visaggio via Twitter
    • A writer named Magdalene Visaggio recently used FaceApp and Airbrush to generate convincing portraits of early U.S. presidents.
    • "Deepfake" technology has improved drastically in recent years, and some countries are already experiencing how it can weaponized for political purposes.
    • It's currently unknown whether it'll be possible to develop technology that can quickly and accurately determine whether a given video is real or fake.
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    There’s no way we could stop a rogue AI

    Max Planck Institute scientists crash into a computing wall there seems to be no way around.

    Credit: josefkubes/Adobe Stock
    • Artificial intelligence that's smarter than us could potentially solve problems beyond our grasp.
    • AI that are self-learning can absorb whatever information they need from the internet, a Pandora's Box if ever there was one.
    • The nature of computing itself prevents us from limiting the actions of a super-intelligent AI if it gets out of control.
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    From NASA to your table: A history of food from thin air

    A fairly old idea, but a really good one, is about to hit the store shelves.

    Credit: Brian McGowan/Unsplash/mipan/Adobe Stock/Big Think
    • The idea of growing food from CO2 dates back to NASA 50 years ago.
    • Two companies are bringing high-quality, CO2-derived protein to market.
    • CO2-based foods provide an environmentally benign way of producing the protein we need to live.
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