Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
Learn
from the world's big
thinkers
Start Learning

Do antidepressants create more mental illness than they cure?

Robert Whitaker discusses the long-term impact of prescription medication.

Photo by Emiliano Vittoriosi on Unsplash
  • Many antidepressants show no better efficacy than placebo or talk therapy in long-term usage.
  • Proselytizing pharmaceutical interventions has been part of a concerted effort since the 1970s.
  • Journalist Robert Whitaker discusses the impact of pathologizing children, moral therapy, and more.
Keep reading Show less
Photo by Anusha Barwa on Unsplash
  • A 2019 study in Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion found that religious believers are more likely to own dogs than cats.
  • Researchers found that hardcore evangelicals are less likely to own pets than more the progressive religious.
  • Pet ownership also skews political: Democrats prefer cats while Republicans choose dogs.
Keep reading Show less

Withdrawal symptoms from antidepressants can last over a year, new study finds

We must rethink the "chemical imbalance" theory of mental health.

Photo Illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images
  • A new review found that withdrawal symptoms from antidepressants and antipsychotics can last for over a year.
  • Side effects from SSRIs, SNRIs, and antipsychotics last longer than benzodiazepines like Valium or Prozac.
  • The global antidepressant market is expected to reach $28.6 billion this year.
Keep reading Show less

Why is Gen X more stressed than other generations?

A Penn State study finds today's middle-aged are experiencing much higher stress levels than 30 years ago.

Photo By Getty Images
  • A study based at Penn State found the middle-aged are much more stressed than other age groups.
  • While most generations average a 2 percent increase in stress levels from 1990, those aged 45-64 show a 19 percent uptick.
  • The reasons include concern for their children, fears of unemployment, and a deluge of information.
Keep reading Show less
Photo by Ronny Hartmann / AFP
  • A study of nearly 100,000 health care workers found that those who attend weekly religious services are less likely to die from a "death of despair."
  • The Harvard researchers note that women are considerably less likely to die such a death than men.
  • Community support seems to be a major reason for helping people grapple with existential distress.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast