How to manage self-inflicted stress

Stress and anxiety therapist Dr. Amelia Aldao suggests waiting 60 seconds before reacting to a stressor, giving your rational mind time to catch up to your emotions.

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  • Stress is a complex defense mechanism that we experience in relation to either internal or external threats.
  • Self-inflicted stress is stress we inflict upon ourselves with our emotional and behavioral responses to certain situations. An example of self-inflicted stress would be your car breaking down on the morning of an important meeting because your "check engine" let had been on, but you ignored it.
  • There are a few ways for you to cope with self-inflicted internal and external stressors, put forth by researchers and therapists.
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Large study confirms diet linked to anxiety disorders

Once again, sugar-rich processed foods are shown to increase the likelihood of anxiety.

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  • Ten percent of the global population currently suffers from an anxiety disorder.
  • A Canadian-based team discovered a link between anxiety and high-sugar, processed foods.
  • Subjects whose diets were high in fruits and vegetables were less likely to suffer from such a disorder.
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New study details the results of tech-free vacations

A new study highlights the effects of a "digital detox" while traveling.

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  • A new study highlights what happens when travelers do not use technology while visiting foreign destinations.
  • Participants initially reported withdrawal symptoms, only to enjoy the experience more as the day progressed.
  • "Digital detox" retreats are growing in popularity, though the cost of many can be prohibitive.
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Jordan Peterson on why you need to clean your room

Sometimes the basics really matter.

Dr. Jordan Peterson. (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
  • Jordan Peterson believes that only by taking care of your immediate environment can you then move onto bigger challenges.
  • The idea stems from millennials who want to change capitalist economic structures though can be applied broadly.
  • In a distracted age, our inability to pay attention to our environment is leading to increased rates of anxiety and depression.
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Stimulating this part of the brain causes ‘uncontrollable urge to laugh’

Interestingly, electrically stimulating the cingulum bundle also seems to reduce anxiety.

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  • In a study of epilepsy patients undergoing electrical stimulation brain mapping, scientists discovered that the stimulation of the cingulum bundle reliably produced laughter, smiles and calm feelings.
  • The findings could someday help scientists develop better treatments for anxiety, depression and chronic pain.
  • One obstacle preventing this kind of treatment from becoming accessible is that it requires invasive surgery, though improved technology could someday change that.
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