Drug prevention advice for parents

How to talk to kids responsibly about drugs.

  • The majority of kids are going to experiment with drugs at some point in their lives, mostly in their teens and early 20s.
  • While many parents might balk at allowing their children to experiment, it's important to remember that not all drugs are the same.
  • There are some warning signs, however. Neuroscience journalist Maia Szalavitz walks us through some of the signs to look out for.

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College students choose smartphones over food, researchers find

Phone usage was found to have similar reinforcing tendencies as eating or doing drugs.

Artur Debat / Moment Mobile / Getty Images
  • An experiment out of Buffalo shows that students are willing to put off eating in order to look at their phones.
  • The subjects were willing to pay ever increasing amounts of money to use their phones even as the price of food remained the same.
  • The finding doesn't prove phone addiction is a thing, but it makes it possible.
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Maps reveal how each U.S. state enforces drug laws differently

Drug use and arrests are rising overall, but those changes vary depending on the state.

Detox.net
  • Detox.net recently published maps that use the latest government data on drug use and arrests to show how enforcement varies across the country.
  • Marijuana arrests remain significantly high in many states, even in some where pot's legalized.
  • Methamphetamine is, by far, the drug most commonly involved in drug-related offenses across the country.
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Coffee drinkers adverse to bitter tastes... drink more coffee.

Science will always be amazing.

Photo: Robert Shunev / Unsplash
  • A new study shows that humans with a genetic variant making them adverse to caffeine drink more coffee.
  • The same is not true with other bitter flavors, such as PROP and quinine.
  • Tea and alcohol drinkers did not produce the same results.
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A new study confirms that e-cigs damage your heart

The damage might not be "as bad" as traditional cigarettes, but it's still pretty bad.

Photo: Vaping360 / Flickr
  • E-cigarettes reduce the amount of nitric oxide being produced, increasing the likelihood of heart damage.
  • Vaping might be "healthier" than smoking traditional cigarettes, but as more research continues to be published, e-cigs are certainly not being shown as "healthy."
  • Juul's recent removal of flavored pods from retail outlets was pre-empting forthcoming FDA regulations.
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