Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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  • A study of nearly 100,000 health care workers found that those who attend weekly religious services are less likely to die from a "death of despair."
  • The Harvard researchers note that women are considerably less likely to die such a death than men.
  • Community support seems to be a major reason for helping people grapple with existential distress.
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The COVID-19 pandemic is causing an increase in relapses. Here are signs to look for.

Being aware of this issue is a big first step in helping vulnerable communities (such as those struggling with addiction) combat relapse during this pandemic.

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  • Many mental health and addiction professionals are worried that the lockdown, quarantine and isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic will cause a surge in relapses of individuals who are struggling with sobriety at this time.
  • Stress, loneliness, isolation, boredom and a lack of support for the addiction community are the biggest triggers for relapse right now.
  • However, being aware of these triggers and supporting those in your life struggling with addiction through the help of online platforms can be a way to combat relapses during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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A breakthrough in chronic pain relief

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen might have discovered a cure.

  • A team at the University of Copenhagen discovered a peptide that cured mice of chronic pain with no side effects.
  • An estimated 7-10 percent of the world's population suffers from chronic pain.
  • The peptide, Tat-P4-(C5)2, previously showed signs of curing addiction in mice.
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    Kids today are lacking these psychological nutrients

    The key to raising indistractable kids is to first determine why they're distracted.

    • When it comes to the rules and restrictions placed on children, author and Stanford Graduate School of Business lecturer Nir Eyal argues that they have a lot in common with another restricted population in society: prisoners. These restrictions have contributed to a generation that overuses and is distracted by technology.
    • Self-determination theory, a popular theory of human motivation, says that we all need three things for psychological well-being: competence, autonomy, and relatedness. When we are denied these psychological nutrients, the needs displacement hypothesis says that we look for them elsewhere. For kids today, that means more video games and screen time.
    • In order to raise indistractable kids, Eyal says we must first address issues of overscheduling, de-emphasize standardized tests as indicators of competency, and provide them with ample free time so that they can be properly socialized in the real world and not look to technology to fill those voids.

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    Early marijuana use 'primes' the brain to enjoy cocaine, study suggests

    A new study on rats suggests that using marijuana as an adolescent "reprograms the initial behavioral, molecular, and epigenetic response to cocaine."

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    • In the study, adolescent and adult rats were first given a synthetic cannabinoid and then cocaine.
    • The results showed that the young rats' brains were more sensitive to the effects of cocaine, but these effects weren't observed in the adult rats.
    • The researchers suggest that research like this can help to develop better treatments for substance abuse disorders.

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