Yuri Orlov – The Cornell physicist who was arrested by the KGB and exiled to Siberia

The incredible story of a scientist who survived gulags, fighting to change his country and physics.

  • Physicist Yuri Orlov fought for human rights during the Cold War.
  • He was arrested by the KGB and exiled to Siberia.
  • Orlov's story can inspire scientists to fight for their beliefs.
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This is how we end hyper-partisan politics

Want to empower social change? Break bread, literally, with the so-called enemy.

  • Alice Dreger shares brilliant advice for divisive times: Break bread, literally, with your so-called enemy. "[S]ee if [you] can have a conversation, and preferably to do it over food or drink, because there is something very primal in us about sharing food and drink that allows us, I think, to open our hearts and our minds."
  • If you're passionate about social change, Dreger recommends avoiding destructive tools or methods that would cause a kind of "arms race" in activism—it leads somewhere that no one wants to go.
  • Spend time getting to know the issues you care about from a nonpartisan perspective—do descriptive, not normative, research. It will remind you of what the other side may be seeing that you might be missing because you're blinded by your partisan side.
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A guide to DIY activism, from the creator of the Pussyhat

Activism 101: How to balance creativity and mission—and not burn out.

  • Krista Suh founded the Pussyhat Project, a bold and powerful visual statement that saw handcrafted pink beanies on thousands of heads at women's marches across the world in January of 2017 through to today.
  • Suh advises aspiring activists not to underestimate themselves and the unique talents that can help them launch a big movement. "What are your skills, what do you actually have fun doing?" she asks. Once you know that, it can empower the cause you care about.
  • Two common hurdles in activism are feeling ineffective and feeling burnt-out, says Suh. If you feel ineffective, take on more leadership; instead of going along, ask: What cause can I lead? If you feel burnt out, consider stepping back and participating in other people's missions, rather than spread yourself thin.
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200 Google workers will walk out on Thursday over sexual misconduct handling

The "Women's Walk" (as Google has named it) will occur in response to how the company handled sexual misconduct claims against one of its executives.

(Credit: ALAIN JOCARD/AFP/Getty Images)
  • 48 people have been terminated from Google for sexual misconduct in the last two years.
  • 13 of those were senior management.
  • The highest-level senior manager manager accused—creator of the Android OS Andy Rubin—is the only one who received a $90-million "golden parachute".
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Why whistleblowing is the loneliest and most courageous act in the world

'Whose job is it to fix the bad stuff in the world?' asks Alice Dreger.

  • Living with integrity means being able to fall asleep at night having asked and answered these questions: Did I treat other people well today? Did I uphold the principles that I really care about? Did I take care of injustice?
  • If you feel you need to call out bad behavior or blow the whistle on injustice, Alice Dreger offers this advice: "Can you get other people to do it with you? That will often help lighten the blow of the backlash. And then, can you afford to lose what it is you might lose?"
  • Choose your battles—you cannot fix everything. But, says Dreger, if more people called out injustice when they saw it, the world would be infinitely better to live in for all of us.